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Expert: New rules set stage for shift in e-waste handling

When the new Electronic Waste Regulations are finally gazetted, it will be mandatory for producers and importers of electronic goods to state clearly how and where the products will be treated upon the end of their life. Vicky Onderi, a former environmental officer in charge of e-waste at Nema tells People Daily’s JAMES MOMANYI  how Kenya  became a pioneer in regulation of e-waste management and her role in the significant move

Q: Who is Vicky Onderi and what do Kenyans need to know about electronic waste?

A: I was born and brought up in Kisii county before I moved to Nairobi for post-secondary studies and later work. I have a master’s degree in environmental management from the University of Nairobi and a postgraduate diploma in environmental management for developing and emerging economies from Dresden University in Germany.

I worked for the National Environment Management Authority (Nema) as an environment officer in charge of e-learning and waste management at a time when the continent started to engage on how to manage e-waste.

Although I resigned from Nema in 2013, I have been part of the team that has championed the formulation of the e-waste regulations, which were discussed and passed in Parliament last week. Currently, I am a director at East Africa Compliance Recycling Company, a consultancy firm on e-waste management.

On the second question, electronic waste comprises any electronic product whose life (usage)has come to end and needs to be disposed of. According to United Nations Environmental Programme (Unep), Kenya generates annually over 11,400 tonnes of e-waste from refrigerators, 2,800 tonnes from TVs, 2,500 tonnes of e-waste from computers, 500 tonnes from printers and 150 tonnes from mobile phones, among other products. This is a lot of e-waste, which if not properly treated can be harmful to the environment and people.

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Q: How did you get involved with the e-waste management or was was it your line of study?

A: Prior to 2010, Kenya, and in general Africa, didn’t have e-waste guidelines, policy and regulations. In 2010, environment ministries from across the continent met and passed a resolution that called for the mainstreaming of technology-supported learning in the environment sector.

I was tasked to develop drafts on e-waste guidelines together with my colleagues at the department. We formed four working groups to focus on capacity building, infrastructure and connectivity, monitoring and evaluation and digital content for e-waste management.

The infrastructure and connectivity working group developed a draft on the e-waste policy, regulations and guidelines. But we realised that without a clear roadmap on implementation, the guidelines will be meaningless. Furthermore, without the legal framework, the guidelines would not serve any purpose.

This forced us to organise a Pan-African conference in March 2012 to discuss the issues from a continental perspective and come up with a common solution for all African countries.

It’s worth noting that Kenya is the only country in Africa that has, so far, formulated the e-waste regulations while others such as South Africa, Nigeria, Zambia and others it is still work in progress.

Q: Who have been the main actors in Kenya in the formulation of structures and systems of the e-waste framework?

A: There have been many actors since the journey started in 2010. Besides Nema, the government through the Office of the Presidency in the current and the previous regime has played a great role.

Various ministries such the Environment, Education, Industrialisation, Communication together as well as agencies such as KRA, Kebs and Parliament have played a huge role, especially in putting in place e-waste regulations.

Allow me to point out the great role the directors of Nema and the Environment Cabinet secretary Judi Wakhungu have played.

President Uhuru Kenyatta and his Deputy William Ruto have also supported the work done by various actors, with government taking e-waste management as one of its flagship projects.

In Parliament, the Speaker Justin Muturi has been the main driving force together with Committee on Environment chaired by Amina Abdallah and the Committee on Delegated Legislation led by Baringo North MP William Cheptumo.

The trio played a key role in organising several seminars where Kenyan MPs and their East Africa Legislative Assembly (EALA) counterparts were upraised on e-waste. This made it possible for the MPs to debate and pass the Electronic Waste Regulations now awaiting gazettement.

Apart from Kenyan institutions, Unep and the European Union have played a major role in providing resources and partnerships that have made the journey possible.

African Union has also been of great support, especially in making e-waste a continental agenda that needs common solution. Currently, we are developing a tool kit so that the regulations can be adopted by all African countries.

Q: What are some of the major provisions in the regulations that will impact on the society directly?

A: One of the provisions is that henceforth, no company will manufacture or import any electronics without stating where its e-waste will be treated after end of their life.

They must sign an MoU with the treatment facility before the product is allowed into the country. That is why KRA and Kebs have been part of the teams developing the regulations, together with importers and producers.

Q: What are some of the impacts of electronic waste to human beings and environment?

A: Electronic waste releases to the environment toxic chemicals such as lead, barium, mercury and other harmful components into environment, which endanger lives of both the public and the workers involved in the recycling process.

E-waste, when burnt, causes air pollution through release of toxic emissions, some of which are known carcinogens. Poor disposal blocks water channels, contaminates land and compromises scenic beauty.

Recycling makes business sense because end of electronic equipment contain valuable resources and precious metals such as gold, silver, copper, steel, aluminium, and plastics.

But more importantly, with the kind of system the stakeholders and the government are currently trying to put in place, the e-waste management sector is going to be one of the biggest creators of employment because there are going to be many people involved in collection, recycling or treatment and disposal.

My e-waste treatment company is already in talks with the governors to have collection points in all counties. Women and youth groups will be involved in the programme and, in return, earn a decent living.

Q: A part from e-waste management benefits, what are other attendant gains Kenyans will derive from management structures put in place?

A: Foremost, Kenya is going to be the focal point of e-waste management in Africa being the pacesetter. Other countries will learn from us and this will involve knowledge and skills transfer.

Since we have also established treatment facilities, most countries, especially in the Comesa region may prefer to bring their waste here for treatment the same way most European countries take theirs to Belgium, which has the biggest treatment facility in Europe.

Secondly, almost all public universities in Kenya have signed an MoU with UK’s Northampton University to partner in the training on e-waste management.

This means we are also going to be pacesetters in the academia and research in the field of e-waste management in the continent. The spill-overs will be massive.

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Source: mediamaxnetwork


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Cleaning up the E-Waste Recycling Industry

By Julie Ann Aelbrecht, student in financial journalism, City University-London and Aarhus University

Upon opening a shipment of computers it had received through the International Children’s Fund (ICF), a Ghanaian school discovered the equipment sent was 15 years old. Most of the computers needed replacement parts, parts that weren’t available anymore. In the end, the school managed to get only a single computer working again.

While the ICF had good intentions, a fake charity had handed it a container of what was meant to be workable secondhand material that was actually closer to its end of life–that is, effectively waste. That unfortunate Ghanaian school is only one victim in a long chain of corruption, theft and organized crime that stretches from Brussels to Cape Town.

This is the global trade in electronic waste, or e-waste. It is estimated to be worth over $19 billion and leaves a trail of criminality behind it. The flow of discarded electronics follows a route where European countries turn a blind eye to theft and major companies bend and break recycling rules to get electronics to developing markets, where the waste disappears into dangerous ad hoc dumps. There, the waste is often dealt with by illegal recyclers in ways that are catastrophic to the environment and human health.

But while e-waste is a dirty business, some are trying to clean it up, mostly by bringing these informal recyclers slowly into the regulated recycling industry.

The starting point for the trail of dirty recycling is Europe. According to the European Union, an estimated quarter of a million tons of electronic waste gets shipped out to developing nations every year. Since 1992, the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal has made all international shipping of such waste illegal. The EU produces approximately 10 million tons of electrical and electronical equipment a year. Officially, it recovers 3.5 million.

“Say you get tired of a computer. Maybe you’ll leave it in the street, maybe you take it to the collection point or to a charity, maybe it makes it to the plant, maybe it is taken to the harbor. There’s a lot of different points in the recycling chain, and every single one is leaking like hell,” says Cosima Dannoritzer, director of “The E-waste Tragedy,” a documentary that sheds light on what happens with discarded European electronics.

European law requires the inclusion of a recycling fee in the price of electronics. So when your computer breaks down, it should find its way into the recycling system and be processed because you’ve already paid for that. In reality, though, up to 75 percent of electronics disappear along the way.

The problem is not limited to any particular region of Europe. “In Spain, young people steal e-waste because they’re unemployed,” says Dannoritzer. “In the U.K., the privatization of the sector has made prices too low to properly recycle, so plants start to do double bookkeeping,” she adds. “There’s a large secondhand market in Germany, but the line between secondhand and broken is really blurry.” Every country seems to have its own particular problem, but the result is almost always the same.

At one collection point in Spain, the employees go for lunch at 2:30 pm. At 2:31, people crawl through holes made in the fence to steal dumped parts. Dannoritzer’s film contains several scenes like this one, illustrating one of the many leaking points in the e-waste chain. “During that lunch break, three individuals came in, one of them dressed up in a little fluorescent jacket, so he could rummage around unnoticed. Another was a teenager with a shopping trolley,” the director says.

The recycling fee for a refrigerator in Spain is typically 20 euros (U.S. $22) and is paid by the consumer. Dannoritzer says one particular group–some working in the collecting points, others driving the trucks or working at the recycling plants–stole half a million fridges and extracted the precious metals to sell before dumping the rest. At 20 euros per fridge, that is a 10 million euro (U.S. 11 million) loss for the authorities–and profit for the thieves–even leaving aside the toxic pollution risk posed by the cannibalized fridges.

This stolen waste then goes to storage facilities, which aren’t too hard to spot, according to Dannoritzer. “To recycle well is expensive, so when you see a large facility or a hall, or a pile of rubbish under the elements without machinery, they’re usually not properly recycling them. That’s a storage facility to fill up containers.”

A recent EU report called waste management one of the industrial sectors most prone to corruption. Every year, 250,000 tons of e-waste don’t reach their intended destination due to a lack of funding, the activities of criminal gangs, and companies and officials choosing to look the other way along the recycling trail. Instead, the waste is stolen, stripped and sold to be put on containers.

These containers are then shipped to developing countries, where their contents are often dealt with under illegal, dangerous circumstances. One of the main destinations for European e-waste is Africa.

“Under the guise of giving poorer countries access to IT, a lot of junk gets into Africa,” says Mathias Schluep, head of Sustainable Recycling Industries (SRI). “The motivation is not bad, but the business model doesn’t leave room to test every single computer in every single container. On the other side of the equation, when the ship arrives in China or Ghana, people know that not all of it will work. That is how business works.”

Schluep’s organization works in Ghana, Egypt and Peru, where rates for formal recycling are around 20 percent, which means that the rest of it happens in what are, at best, semi-illegal circumstances. SRI’s projects aim to formalize a lot of these small-scale, informal operations.

Sampson Atiemo, local project coordinator for SRI in Ghana, explains how the organization tries to pull these illegal recyclers into the formal industry. “There are people in the informal sector who are ready to do things the right way. We’ll identify them and bring them up,” he says.

Atiemo estimates that 80 percent of the Ghanaian e-waste sector is controlled by the informal sector, overshadowing formal recycling practices, but he believes SRI can change this. “Once we identify the illegal recyclers, we look at their technology, their challenges and what support they need. We train them, send them to the STEP e-waste academy, change the way they do things,” he says. SRI trains the illegal recyclers in methods meeting regulatory standards, getting them out of illegal practices. In doing so, it hopes to bring an end to practices like burning waste in open air.

Schluep believes that along with the waste, the criminality gets imported. “Africa is not corrupt because of the culture. It’s because the Europeans brought it over there with their business. It’s not an African thing or an Asian thing or a Latin thing. It’s us, and it’s embarrassing.”

Besides specific initiatives like SRI, in some countries the waste industry itself is attempting to bring illegal recyclers into the formal sector, hoping to reform them. In South Africa, collection and treatment of e-waste is not yet part of the legal framework. The Southern African E-waste Alliance (SAEWA), a nationwide syndicate representing e-waste recyclers, is developing a blueprint to get the recycling industry involved in the issue.

“Because the entry-level requirements are so high, South Africa has only a handful of fully legally compliant recyclers for e-waste, so most of the processing is done illegally,” SAEWA head Susanne Karcher explains.

SAEWA started out working only with the legally compliant companies, but after realizing that this left out the vast majority of the industry, it decided to begin trying to include informal and illegal recyclers as affiliates.

“You need the big shark in every ocean, but you also need the bottom-feeders, the little fish that can go under the stone,” says Karcher. “I believe we have to capitalize on that instead of squashing those people, but involve them into the economy.”

In any case, she says, large legal recyclers are already making use of the small informal collectors. South Africa generates 360,000 tons of e-waste every year, and only 10 percent makes it to formal recyclers. “As far as the destination of the rest, your guess is as good as mine, but we know that 30 to 40 percent of the business of the big recyclers is people that directly sell to them with their trolleys from the street. They’re buying from the informal sector.”

As it is, there are perverse incentives for recycling the informal way. “You get paid less when you come to a recycler with a complete unit than if you come with a printed wire board or a copper bit. So people rather smash the computer outside of the quarters and bring in the bits that pay. But a lot of material is lost this way,” Karcher explains. Because the international demand for the precious materials contained in certain parts of the e-waste is so high, the low-value parts of it, like the plastic, are unwanted by the big recycling companies, which therefore pay less for whole pieces containing them.

By working with the informal providers, SAEWA believes it can limit loss, reduce informal activities to collection only (discouraging the often dangerous efforts at recycling itself) and better represent those working in the industry. “We want to be the voice of the industry, which includes the formal and the informal sector. We cannot pretend they don’t exist. They know they are illegal, but they want to better themselves, and that’s good enough for us,” Karcher says.

With e-waste recycling an ever larger industry, it seems there is little alternative but to take those involved in its shadowy side into account. Dannoritzer tells another story from Spain. At a public city council’s collection point, they kept the e-waste container right next to the fence, far away from the others and far away from the cameras. Just outside, a large truck belonging to a scrap dealer was parked. “People’s awareness is key,” she says. “Where we see rubbish, they see treasure.”

Source: huffingtonpost


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