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Atterbury awarded Deloitte Gauteng office development tender

After considering more than 15 submissions, Deloitte has awarded the tender to develop its sizeable purpose-developed offices in Gauteng to Atterbury. Atterbury is developing the new Deloitte Gauteng office on behalf of a 50/50 joint venture between co-owners Atterbury and JSE-listed real estate capital growth fund Attacq Limited.

Deloitte’s new premises will be developed in Waterfall in Midrand. The total estimated development cost is in excess of R1bn.

Mike Jarvis, chief operating officer of Deloitte Africa, says: “The consolidation of our Johannesburg and Pretoria offices into one Gauteng office in Waterfall City promises to be an exciting journey. We are quickly outgrowing both existing office spaces and are now in a position to bring together approximately 3,700 of our people into one, new, custom-designed building in what is clearly an attractive corporate destination. Deloitte is constantly looking for ways in which our people can make a meaningful impact to our clients, talent and communities. This move will help us do exactly that by gearing our operations to attract the best talent and serve our expanding market.”

Silver LEED Green Rating

The premises will comprise 42,500m2 of quality workspace, which will consolidate Deloitte’s current Woodmead and Pretoria offices in a single central location. The building has space capacity for close to 5,000 people.

The office premises will consist of a ground floor with six storeys of offices and four basement parking levels including nearly 2,000 parking bays. Commercial architecture practice Aevitas designed the new Deloitte headquarters, which will comply with a Silver LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Green Rating on completion.

Bulk earthworks for the project will start in August 2017, with construction commencing on Deloitte’s new Gauteng office in the final quarter of this year. The development will be complete in the first quarter of 2020. Deloitte will begin operating from its new South African base from April 2020.

Source: bizcommunity

Home green: What makes a green home?

What is a green home?

The simple answer is a green home is one that has been built, remodeled, or retrofitted to meet higher standards than conventional construction, with the goal of achieving healthier, more resource-efficient, more cost-effective homes that enhance the lives and experiences the people who live in them.

Generally there is independent, third party verification to document that standards have been met or exceeded. This verification serves as the basis for certification of green homes and provides valuable information for consumers, helping in comparison shopping and decision-making.

There are several organizations that have developed standards for green building and development. Certification by any of these organizations is strong evidence that the home is built or remodeled to higher standards. Here are some of the most widely known and recognized green home standards.

Leader in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards developed by the U.S. Green Building Council. LEED certification is available for construction and remodeling of commercial buildings, schools and other institutional buildings, homes and neighborhoods.

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Energy Star is another set of standards that are widely recognized. Energy Star-certified homes must meet specific standards for energy efficiency, water conservation, and for Indoor air quality and health.

The National Green Building Standard (NGBS) was developed by the National Association of Home Builders. It is the first residential green building standard to undergo the full consensus process and receive approval from the American National Standards Institute.

There are other organizations offering green building certification, many of which are regional or statewide, such as the Build Green New Mexico Standards, largely adapted from the U.S. Home Builders Association standards.

Generally speaking, consumers can feel confident that a “green certified” home does indeed meet higher standards and offers specific, documentable benefits to the homeowner and residents of the home.

Does that mean a home without certification can’t be a green home? Absolutely not! I have worked with many people who have sought to make their homes healthier and more comfortable, enjoyable, energy and resource efficient, and cost effective. Every action taken to enhance these attributes of a home, in my estimation, makes a home more “green.”

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There are generally six areas, or attributes, of homes in which standards are established for “green homes,” and in which improvements can be made.

Location: We all know real estate is all about “location, location, location”. But it’s not just status people are looking for today in location – people are choosing neighborhoods based on how they want to live and where they want to spend most of their time. For some, that means being in natural settings with open spaces and views. Others are choosing locations convenient to their jobs, schools, and daily activities that are important to them. The U.S. Green Building Council has developed standards for neighborhood development based on the following questions:

Is your local grocery store within walking distance, and is there a sidewalk for you to trek there safely?

Does your neighborhood boast high-performing green buildings, parks and green space?

Do bikes, pedestrians and vehicles play nicely together on the road?

These questions are becoming increasingly important for people of all ages and in all areas of the country.

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Design: We humans spend up to 90 percent of our time indoors. It makes sense that time should be spent in spaces that make us happy, allow us to breathe easily, give us views of nature, bring in plenty of daylight, and make us healthier and more productive. Trends are showing increasing preference for smaller but better designed homes – this means architectural and interior design are becoming increasingly important for better living.

Energy efficiency and renewable energy: Energy efficiency and cost effectiveness rank high with today’s buyers. Buyers are looking at the monthly cost of home ownership rather than the overall price or price per square foot of the home. Most understand utility costs are a significant and growing part of their monthly cost of home ownership, and that an energy-efficient green home with low utility bills can be less costly to own on a month to month basis than a conventional home. Today, renewable energy (usually in the form of solar power) is a top priority for many homeowners. It has proven easy, reliable and cost effective. And, it adds value to a home.

Water efficiency: This is an aspect of green homes that is gaining in popularity throughout the country, and most especially in our desert Southwest.

Indoor air quality: Poor indoor air in our homes can result in a variety of issues, including irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat, headaches, dizziness, allergies, respiratory problems, and other, often serious, health problems. Many people aren’t even aware the materials used in conventional homes often put out harmful gases. Poorly constructed homes often have moisture problems that can lead to mold and other problems. Poorly maintained heating and cooling systems can compromise indoor air quality.

Materials and resources: Reusing old materials such as brick, wood flooring, beams, windows, etc., is a really cool way to be “green.” There are more recycled and renewable materials available today, giving people maximum choices to express their taste and be green at the same time. One of the most sustainable choices people can make is to makeover an existing home. That’s reusing and recycling at its best.

A home doesn’t have to be certified, nor does it have to address all six of these areas to be green. Bringing a home to higher standards in even one of these areas can a difference. Whether “green certified,” or just “green improved,” what is important is that the improvements are in line with the goals and priorities of the people who live in the home.

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Source: lcsun-news


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PENETRON Waterproofs New Mercedes-Benz Stadium

The newest – and most stylish – stadium in the NFL is also one of the “greenest,” with a comprehensive rainwater recycling system based on PENETRON crystalline waterproofing technology. The first Atlanta Falcons home game is set for the 2017 season opener, but the concrete structures treated by PENETRON were completed this month.

Set to open in time for the 2017 NFL season opener, the new Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, will be the home of the National Football League’s Atlanta Falcons and Major League Soccer’s Atlanta United. The multi-purpose stadium will also host other major sports and entertainment events, including the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Men’s Final Four basketball tournament in 2020. The striking architecture of the stadium features a unique circular roof opening inspired by the oculus in the Pantheon of ancient Rome. The opening can be covered by eight triangular roof-petals that function similar to a camera iris.

Built on an approximately 42-acre area, the project’s total cost when complete could be as much as $1.4 billion. Seating capacity can be set up for 75,000 seats to host a future Super Bowl or FIFA World Cup event, but it can be expanded to as many as 83,000 seats for other events, such as the NCAA Men’s Final Four.

“This new stadium not only looks spectacular, it has numerous environmental features that will help qualify the project for the coveted LEED certification,” explains Christopher Chen, Director of The PENETRON Group. “It integrates the latest in sustainable design, construction, and operation to minimize the environmental impact of such a large facility.”

The LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) certification from the U.S. Green Buildings Council verifies that a construction project meets the highest green building and performance measures. The Mercedes-Benz Stadium project will apply for the Gold Level certificate, one of the program’s highest levels for sustainable construction, which includes advanced solutions for energy efficiency, low water usage and recycling, use of regional/local materials, access to renewable energy resources, enforcement of stringent air quality standards, and a comprehensive recycling system.

The rainwater recycling system is based on an underground water storage vault (two million gallons) and the cistern (700,000 gallons) located outside the stadium. The stored water will be used to irrigate the landscaped Fan Plaza and the numerous garden areas located throughout the sports facility. The concrete used for the storage vault, cistern structures, and major concrete water conduits (over 4,500 cubic yards) was treated with PENETRON ADMIX to ensure a waterproof and durable structure.

“PENETRON crystalline technology has been proven in numerous sports stadium projects across the globe, including: the Summer Olympic Games in Beijing; the Winter Olympic Games 2014 in Sochi, Russia; the last two FIFA World Cups in South Africa and Brazil; and next year’s Summer Olympic venues in Brazil,” adds Mr. Chen. “It’s become a game-winning application for our clients – and these large structures show off the performance of the PENETRON System to great advantage.”

The PENETRON Group is a leading manufacturer of specialty construction products for concrete waterproofing, concrete repairs and floor preparation systems. The Group operates through a global network, offering support to the design and construction community through its regional offices, representatives and distribution channels.

Source: prweb


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Spotlight On The Hotel That Claims To Be Africa’s Greenest: Hotel Verde

There are not a lot of hotels near Cape Town International Airport. Most business and leisure travellers are in a hurry to get to Cape Town, or reluctant to leave, and understandably so, given the city’s many attractions.

That’s why the 145-room Hotel Verde, located about a three-minute drive to Cape Town International Airport, feels like such a game changer. I stayed there my last night of a recent trip to Cape Town and it felt like a glimpse into the future of the hotel industry.

Hotel Verde claims to be Africa’s greenest hotel, built from the ground up according to eco-friendly principles. Staying there, you are practicing conscious, sustainable tourism. It’s the first hotel in Africa to offer a carbon-neutral stay, meaning you know exactly how much or how little your stay impacted the environment, and that makes it an amazingly feel-good experience.

Being accountable for its footprint is the guiding principle behind this hotel, which opened in August, 2013. South Africa’s green building certification wasn’t sophisticated enough for Hotel Verde, said General Manager Samantha Annandale, so they applied for — and got – LEED certification by the U.S. Green Building Council.

Annandale reckons the hotel got about 30 million rand (2.57 million USD) in free publicity just for being green.

Pulling up to the hotel, I knew it was going to be unlike anything I’d ever experienced when I saw the massive wind turbines spinning in the parking lot. But as big as they appear to be, they aren’t big enough, Annandale said. Though these are the most visible signs of green technology at the hotel, the wind turbines turned out to be probably its least productive investment.

“Return on investment (of wind turbines) is 20 years,” Annandale said. “We’d need to build (the wind turbines) bigger to make it worth it. We’ve learned from our mistakes. But they make a huge statement.”

Eco Pool

Annandale spent a lot more time talking to me about the hotel’s eco pool, which uses plants and natural soil filtration to balance bacteria without chlorine. Water is clean and clear, but nothing like the hotel swimming pool international guests are used to, and some find it a bit weird, Annandale said.

Getting used to it requires a new mindset. “We cannot build hotels the way we used to build them,” she said.

Hotel Verde owners Mario and Annemarie Delicio have a 10-year lease on the wetland adjacent to the hotel where they built the eco pool. They took what amounted to a rat-infested swamp and turned it into an outdoor gym, with plants that attract birds and bees, owl houses and beehives that the hotel harvests. Kids staying at the hotel can go on a treasure hunt there.

Born in Italy and raised in Germany, Mario is a longtime South African resident and the shareholder in another hotel in Ethiopia.

One of Mario’s goals at Hotel Verde was to have zero waste to landfill. “We wanted to revolutionize that,” Annandale said. So far, the hotel manages to divert an 91-to-94 percent of waste from the landfill and they do that by recycling. The hotel has a composting room. Packaging is returned to suppliers. “One thing you can never control is what guests bring in,” Annandale said.

About 30 percent of the hotel staff’s time is spent educating school children, guests, tours and site inspectors.

Hotel Verde construction cost about 240 million rand ($20.5 million) and building it green cost about 20 million rand ($1.7 million) more than an ordinary hotel would have cost, Annandale estimates. It will take three to five years to see a return on the investment, she said.

Annandale is particularly proud of the room where gray water from guest showers is recycled. It’s fed into tanks, filtered by ultraviolet light, and then piped back up into the building to flush guest toilets.

The hotel also has a 40,000-liter rainwater harvesting tank for car washing, irrigation and cleaning.

To save energy on water heating, a geothermal loop system 90 feet beneath the surface of the hotel taps into the natural water in the earth, acting as a heat sink for the hotel water.

Engineers from the University of Cape Town visit the hotel, which serves as a model for the Stellenbosch municipality.

Art designed by local school children and South African artists is used to decorate the hotel. School children in the nearby townships don’t get art education, according to Annandale. Mario agreed to fund an art education project on condition the children learn about sustainability. In return, they created the designs for stunning tapestries that decorate the common areas on the floor I my room was on.

Using Recycled Products

One wall in the lobby was textured with recycled glass. The hotel’s carpet runners are made of recycled plastic. On the outside of the hotel, a five-story mosaic art installation was designed by Svenja, Mario’s youngest daughter.

There is free unlimited Wi-Fi and sensor lighting throughout Hotel Verde, and my room was paperless, in that all hotel information was on the TV.

One of my favorite places in the hotel was in the basement garage, where graffiti artists had been invited to come in and paint. This turned out to be a moneymaker for the hotel. Guests loved the basement art and some have paid to have banquets there, Annandale said.

But you probably want to hear about the rooms. I loved that the butter cookies I found on the coffee tray in my room were made by a local woman in Mitchell’s Plain, one of South Africa’s largest townships.

“We helped her become compliant in food preparation and now she employs two people,” Annandale said.

When you check out of Hotel Verde, you have the option to offset your carbon footprint and you can track where and how it was offset. Just knowing that made me feel good.

Source: AFK Insider

VanDusen Botanical Garden Visitor Centre, Vancouver, Canada

Inspired by organic forms and natural systems, the VanDusen Botanical Garden Visitor Centre in Vancouver seeks to create a harmonious balance between architecture and landscape from both a visual and an ecological perspective. Completed in 2011, this dynamic 1,765 sm single-story structure includes an innovative roof form that appears to float above the building’s curved rammed earth and concrete walls. Metaphorically representing undulating petals, the building form flows seamlessly into a central oculus and the surrounding landscape.

The building was designed to align with, and contribute to the Garden’s conservation mission. Through mapping and analyzing the Garden’s ecology, the project team successfully integrated natural and human systems, restoring biodiversity and ecological balance to the site.

The Visitor Centre recently achieved LEED Platinum certification, and is the first building in Canada to register for the Living Building Challenge (LBC). The LBC places enormous constraints on projects, such as requiring materials to be supplied locally/regionally and restricting Red List Materials like PVC.

Green Building
Photo: Nic Lehoux/Courtesy Perkins+Will

The Visitor Centre uses on-site renewable sources—geothermal boreholes, solar photovoltaics, solar hot water tubes—in conjunction with passive design strategies to achieve annual net-zero energy. With wood as the primary building material, enough carbon is sequestered to achieve carbon neutrality. Rainwater is filtered to provide the building’s greywater requirements; 100% of blackwater is treated by an on-site bioreactor—the first of its kind in Vancouver—and released into a new feature percolation field and garden. Natural ventilation is assisted by a solar chimney, composed of an operable glazed oculus and a perforated aluminum heatsink which converts the sun’s rays to convection energy. The solar chimney is located in the centre of the atrium and exactly at the centre of all the building’s various radiating geometry, highlighting the focal role of sustainability in form and function.

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