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Major South African airports score well in international on-time rankings

South Africa’s three main airports have each been awarded four-star ratings for flight punctuality, Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) has announced. The rankings were awarded by global flight information provider OAG.

The maximum number of stars that can be awarded in the OAG On-Time Performance (OTP) Ratings is five, and only the top 10% of airports and airlines are given five stars. ACSA aims to join that 10%.

The four-star South African airports are all owned and operated by ACSA. The best performer amongst them was Durban’s King Shaka International Airport, with 84.8% on-time performance. This was followed by Cape Town International Airport (84.4%) and Johannesburg’s OR Tambo International Airport (82.9%).

“Operating large airports is a complex business that involves coordination and integration among thousands of people who provide the services required for aircraft to be able to land and take-off at the scheduled times,” pointed out ACSA chief operating officer (Ms) Fundi Sithebe. “When running an airport, one relatively small problem in one area has the potential to create a knock-on effect across the system. This is why it is key for management of airports to focus closely not only on the major elements of delivering on-time performance, but also on things that are perceived to be trivial.”

The OTP ratings are determined over a rolling 12-month timeframe. To qualify for a rating, all airports and airlines must fulfil two criteria. Each must have at least 600 operations a month and they must supply OAG with flight status information for at least 80% of scheduled flights during the 12 months.

“We have in place good people, good systems and world-class infrastructure,” she highlighted. “We know that it is possible to get to the top and this is what motivates us.”

ACSA is Africa’s largest airport operator, responsible for nine South African airports. In addition to the three already mentioned, these are Bram Fischer International Airport(Bloemfontein), East London AirportGeorge AirportKimberley AirportPort Elizabeth Airport and Upington Airport.

Source: engineeringnews

WHAT IS THE AFRICAN REAL ESTATE & INFRASTRUCTURE SUMMIT?

Join us for the third edition of the award winning African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit which showcases a collection of Africa’s top real estate and infrastructure projects. This exclusive, high-level two day exhibition and interactive conference is attended by over 300 property professionals, developers, investors, city and municipal planners and offers a platform to explore the future of urban development in African cities.

We will explore key themes and topics shaping Africa’s urban growth and development along 2 tracks:

Track 1: Residential Development Summit

Track 2: Commercial, Industrial and Infrastructure Summit

AFRICAN REAL ESTATE & INFRASTRUCTURE SUMMIT EVENT TRACKS

TRACK 1: RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT SUMMIT

Explore and unpack the residential development market with industry thought leaders, keynote presentations and panel discussions around:

  • Housing under the microscope: Exploring regional supply and demand of various asset classes.
  • What land is available for residential development?
  • Exploring the increasing trend of developers holding onto stock, and REITs adding residential to their portfolio.
  • Industry experts unravel how to maximise the value of your residential development.
  • Can mixed-use developments be considered the future of residential development?
  • The affordable housing conundrum: How do we make affordable housing more attractive to investors?
  • Future Focus: Are millennials changing the status quo for property development?

TRACK 2: COMMERCIAL & INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT SUMMIT

Engage with industry thought leaders presenting on both the commercial and industrial landscape tied in with infrastructure development

  • What exciting opportunities lie in our Industrial Development Zones?
  • Examining master planning and public/private collaborations within the commercial property sector.
  • Integrated Urban Development: Investigating successful mixed use development projects with case studies.
  • How do we successfully interlink transport systems to urban developments?
  • Questioning how our African cities are embracing smart technology to become more efficient.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE

Exhibition stands

Take advantage of our unique exhibition stands to showcase products, services and solutions to the audience

Contact us to secure a space on floor.

• Early bird booking R 7, 500 pp (Valid until 29 June 2018)
• Standard booking R 8, 500 pp (Valid until 31 August 2018)
• Late /onsite bookings R 10, 000 pp (Valid until 11 October 2018)

INCLUDES:

• Full access to the 2-day conference programme
• Lunch for both days
• Networking function
• Access to business-to-business matchmaking prior to the event

Sponsorship items

Please enquire about our sponsorship opportunities, these include:

  • Headline sponsor
  • Gold sponsor
  • Silver sponsor
  • Networking sponsor
  • Sessions sponsorships
  • Lunch sponsorship
  • Bag sponsorship
  • Lanyard sponsor

CONTACT US TO SECURE YOUR ATTENDANCE

Richard Stubbs – Portfolio Director
e: richard.stubbs@spintelligent.com
t: +27 21 700 3582

Benjamin Jones Event Manager – Property Buyer Show
e: benjamin.jones@spintelligent.com
t: +27 21 700 3595

Catherine Brassell – Event Manager
e: catherine.brassell@spintelligent.com
t: +27 21 700 3580

Juante Massing – Marketing
e: juante.massing@spintelligent.com
t: +27 21 700 3596

http://www.african-real-estate-summit.com/

 

Intelligent building operations increase green potential

Schneider Electric’s innovative building management, power management systems and small building control products provide a strong foundation for intelligent buildings, which inspire occupant productivity and deliver optimal energy and operational efficiency.

Building facts

  • 42% of the world’s energy is used in buildings
  • 50% of energy used in buildings is wasted because of inefficient building management systems
  • In developed economies, at least half of the buildings expected to be in use in 2050 have already been built
  • Only 25% of building costs are associated with capital expenses, while 75% of costs are used to operate a building over its life cycle
  • Only 20% of facility managers use 80% of the available capabilities in their building management systems
  • 30% of energy used in buildings is waste

‘Green building incorporates design, construction and operational practices that significantly reduce or eliminate the negative impact of development on the environment and people. Green buildings are energy efficient, resource efficient and environmentally responsible’ – Green Building Council South Africa.

Smart building systems enhance people’s safety and comfort, use energy more efficiently, and improve reliability, business performance and operational efficiency.

Kindly see attached image and detailed press release on Schneider Electric’s intelligent building operations.

Please note that the Schneider Electric contact person for this release is Prisca Mashanda, Marketing and Communications Manager. You can contact her on 011-254-6400 or prisca.mashanda@schneider-electric.com

About Schneider Electric 

Schneider Electric is leading the Digital Transformation of Energy Management and Automation in Homes, Buildings, Data Centers, Infrastructure and Industries.

With global presence in over 100 countries, Schneider is the undisputable leader in Power Management – Medium Voltage, Low Voltage and Secure Power, and in Automation Systems. We provide integrated efficiency solutions, combining energy, automation and software.

In our global Ecosystem, we collaborate with the largest Partner, Integrator and Developer Community on our Open Platform to deliver real-time control and operational efficiency.

We believe that great people and partners make Schneider a great company and that our commitment to Innovation, Diversity and Sustainability ensures that Life Is On everywhere, for everyone and at every moment.

For more information, go to www.schneider-electric.co.za

Ramaphosa should shift to green energy – Greenpeace

Environmental organisation Greenpeace is demanding newly-elected President Cyril Ramaphosa takes urgent action on energy policy in South Africa.

Ramaphosa delivered his maiden State of the Nation Address (SONA) on Friday, highlighting economic growth and combating corruption.

“While President Ramaphosa made a compelling attempt to start a new chapter in [Friday’s] SONA address, by failing to declare that nuclear will not go ahead, or provide direction on the country’s energy pathway through the finalisation of the Integrated Resource Plan, he has created more uncertainty in energy policy,” said Mbong Akiy, Greenpeace Africa head of communication.

Ramaphosa sketched broad outlines for moving the economy forward through a focus on industries, such as mining and infrastructure.

“Mining is another area that has massive unrealised potential for growth and job creation,” said Ramaphosa, referring to the industry as a “sunrise industry”.

“If the president is serious about job creation, he would ensure that the barriers to renewable energy are removed immediately, instead of declaring that the mining industry – which is in terminal decline – is a ‘sunrise industry’,” said Akiy.

The Democratic Alliance indicated its opposition to a new nuclear power station.

“Be strong, President Ramaphosa. Reject the nuclear deal and put your weight behind the neglected renewables project so we can move forward into an era of clean, affordable energy,” DA leader Mmusi Maimane said as members of Parliament debated the SONA.

Climate-friendly policies

Greenpeace argued that energy generator Eskom needed to focus on renewable energy as part of a shift to climate-friendly policies.

“The electricity sector is indeed in dire need of certainty and accountability. South Africans deserve clarity on what will be done to ensure that rational, climate-friendly and low-cost energy decisions are taken. It is only the Integrated Resource Plan that can provide that much-needed certainty,” said Akiy.

In his SONA, Ramaphosa hinted that strong action was coming to restore the credibility of Eskom.

“The recent action we have taken at Eskom to strengthen governance, root out corruption and restore its financial position is just the beginning.

“Government will take further measures to ensure that all state-owned companies fulfil their economic and developmental mandates.”

Eskom largely relies on coal for energy generation, with 13 coal-fired plants producing 34 952 megawatts (MW). The nuclear-powered Koeberg plant produces 1 830MW.

Two hydro pump storage schemes and two hydro-electric plants have a combined capacity of 2 000MW.

The company has invested in two wind farms and said that the Klipheuwel system had a capacity of 3MW, while the Sere Windfarm in Vredendal in the Western Cape had a capacity of 100MW.

Akiy demanded that the government develop and implement a plan to ensure greater focus on renewable energy.

“Greenpeace calls for consistency and for the president to ensure that a new Integrated Resource Plan – which takes climate change and the country’s strained water resources into account – is released as soon as possible.”

Source: News24

2018 brings new construction business opportunities to KwaZulu-Natal

KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) is realising its vision to become a prosperous province and a gateway to Africa and the world.  The province already contributes upwards of 16% to South Africa’s overall GDP and boasts the highest export propensity and level of industrialisation in the country.

In line with KwaZulu-Natal’s emergence as a hub of industrial development in sub-Saharan Africa, the 2nd annual KZN Construction Expo opens its doors on 7 February 2018 in Durban – convening thousands of construction professionals, government and investors to support the infrastructure development, service delivery, development partnerships and industry transformation currently underway in the province.

The KZN Construction Expo provides an unprecedented opportunity to access the province’s building and construction value chain, ranging from concrete; construction; digital construction; mechanical, electrical & plumbing; surfaces & finishes; smart buildings/ ecobuild and tools & equipment. This interactive platform not only catalyses new investment into infrastructure but also builds capacity for local architects, construction professionals and small to medium sized contractors through free education and technical skills development during training workshops.

Industry transformation is at the top of the agenda for 2018 and highlighted during the 2nd annual KZN Construction Expo through various interactive presentations and training workshops.  Aubrey Tshalata, National President of the National African Federation for the Building Industry will address the audience on the topic of enterprise development. The Durban Chamber of Commerce and Industry – one of the event partners and supporters – will highlight opportunities for small, medium and micro-sized enterprises within KwaZulu-Natal’s construction sector.

Sponsored by Spider Mini-CranesCarmix and SA Leak Detection and supported by over 60 exhibiting companies and 20 association partners including the Concrete Society of South Africa, Master Builders KwaZulu-Natal, South African Council for Architectural Professions, The Concrete Institute and the Southern Africa Ready-Mix Association, the 2018 edition of the KZN Construction Expo is an unprecedented opportunity to access KZN’s building and construction value chain in a unique setting allowing for prestigious visibility, interactive networking and on-site demonstrations.

Register for your free expo ticket here.

Global water insecurity calls for water infrastructure maintenance

The growing funding gap to keep up with the rehabilitation, operation and maintenance of ageing water infrastructure is a global concern, particularly in the current age of austerity, says global engineering firm Aurecon.

The firm emphasises that new water systems need to be built to cope with increasing populations, shifting consumption patterns, improving technologies, an uncertain future and a changing climate.

“This is the only way we can guarantee the security of our water in the complex times of our future,” say Aurecon waterresources design director Dr Verno Jonker.

To tackle the outlined challenges, he suggests that there must be a global mindset change. “We need to create new sustainable and resilient water realities, based on a comprehensive understanding of problems, imaginative approaches, cooperation, new paradigms, and new technologies.”

In a South African context, Aurecon’s studies indicate the critical importance of constructing integrated bulk water supply infrastructure to mitigate negative impacts associated with limited water supply. This is already seen in the Western Cape’s forced Level 4 water restrictions, which have meant households and businesses have had to take extreme and immediate action to comply with critical water-saving measures.

“Almost every day, there are constant reminders of the increasing scarcity of water and the importance of managing this essential natural resource in the face of increasing demands, degrading environmental conditions and climate change,” says Aurecon water resources engineer Dr James Cullis.

The Value of Water 
Cullis explains that clean, safe drinking water is an important prerequisite for life, the environment and healthy living. He adds that, while many countries globally spend up to 20% of their national budgets on healthcare, investment in quality water supply remains inadequate.

“Globally, 1.1-billion people still do not have access to safe drinking water, and 2.6-billion people – half of the developing world – lack even basic sanitation facilities.”

As a result, Jonker reveals that four out of five illnesses in developing countries have been linked to poor water and sanitation, and one death in five of children under the age of five worldwide is related to waterborne diseases. Even in developed countries, a lack of attention to the protection of critical water supply sources can have significant human health implications.

Food is also dependent on water and without water security, crops and livestock are put at risk,” he points out.

He further highlights that, by 2050, it is expected that foodproduction will demand 20% more water than it currently does, owing to the increase in global standards of living and the trend towards diets consisting of meat and dairy products.

“The amount of water required in the cultivation and production of food and other products is significant. It takes 600 ℓ of water to produce 500 g of wheat, 1 000 ℓ of water for 1 ℓ of milk, and 4 600 ℓ to produce one 300 g beef steak.”

Water as a Catalyst for Peace

Moreover, Cullis explains that one of the greatest challenges for the future is how to ensure sufficient and sustainablewater supply for a growing global population in excess of seven-billion. Sustainable water resources management requires collaborative partnerships among diverse stakeholders.

The human right to water and sanitation acknowledges wateras a shared resource, which brings with it complex hydrological, social, environmental and economic interdependencies, notes Cullis.

“Our growing world will demand more water and generate more pollution. This impacts and threatens ecosystems, water sustainability, peace and security. This, in turn, threatens the future and certainty of the world’s watersupply.”

Water supply risks are exacerbated by inadequate infrastructure spending, maintenance and poor managementand governance. However, Jonker postulate that this could be a necessary catalyst for improved cooperation between countries, especially in regions such as Africa, with 59 transboundary river basins.

The challenge of ensuring that water infrastructure is invested in and maintained is integral to water security. The value of water is only known when it is no longer accessible, he concludes.

Source: Engineeringnews

Water scarcity under the spotlight at Water Research Council meeting

Water scarcity in South Africa will be high on the agenda of a three-day Water Research Council meeting under the theme “Adaptation to the New Normal”‚ which opened on Monday east of Johannesburg.

South Africa is recovering from the 2016 drought and the Western and Eastern Cape are still experiencing critical water shortages.

Minister of Water and Sanitation Nomvula Mokonyana said the rise of extreme weather patterns because of climate change and a growing global population were realities which impacted on water resources.

“The challenges are global‚ therefore the memoranda of understanding with neighbouring Namibia and the Water Research Council must assist in resolving challenges in the regions‚” she said.

The minister said a high-level panel on water was meeting at the UN this week.

“The outcomes of this symposium must speak to a better water future and encourage international partnerships‚” Mokonyana said.

She said Gauteng enjoyed water from Lesotho because of such a partnership.

Water Research Council CEO Desighen Naidoo said the current infrastructure and regulatory environment in South Africa needed to be revisited with vigour.

Priorities he listed included: “Enabling sustainable development and ensuring universal access to basic services in the new normal through creativity‚ innovation and systems amenable to dynamic adaptation and improvement.”

The council’s biennial symposium is a platform for new knowledge and innovation to improve water and sanitation delivery.

South Africa’s average annual rainfall of 490mm is far lower than that of the global average‚ of 814mm per year‚ according to the WWF (World Wide Fund For Nature).

The authoritative Atlas of Freshwater Ecosystem Priority Areas in South Africa reports that more than half of the country’s rivers are being strangled by pollution and water extraction.

Source: talkofthetown

Engineers find way to evaluate green roofs

Green infrastructure is an attractive concept, but there is concern surrounding its effectiveness. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using a mathematical technique traditionally used in earthquake engineering to determine how well green infrastructure works and to communicate with urban planners, policymakers and developers.

Green roofs are flat, vegetated surfaces on the tops of buildings that are designed to capture and retain rainwater and filter any that is released back into the environment.

“The retention helps ease the strain that large amounts of rain put on municipal sewer systems, and filtration helps remove any possible contaminants found in the stormwater,” said Reshmina William, a civil and environmental engineering graduate student who conducted the study with civil and environmental engineering professor Ashlynn Stillwell.

A good-for-the-environment solution to mitigating stormwater runoff may seem like a no-brainer, but a common concern regarding green roofs is the variability of their performance. One challenge is figuring out how well the buildings that hold them up will respond to the increased and highly variable weight between wet and dry conditions. Another challenge is determining how well they retain and process water given storms of different intensity, duration and frequency, William said.

While studying reliability analysis in one of her courses, William came up with the idea to use a seemingly unrelated mathematical concept called fragility curves to confront this problem.

“Earthquake engineering has a similar problem because it is tough to predict what an earthquake is going to do to a building,” William said. “Green infrastructure has a lot more variability, but that is what makes fragility curves ideal for capturing and defining the sort of dynamics involved.”

William and Stillwell chose to study green roofs over other forms of green infrastructure for a very simple reason: There was one on campus fitted with the instrumentation needed to measure soil moisture, rainfall amount, temperature, humidity and many other variables that are plugged into their fragility curve model.

“This is a unique situation because most green roofs don’t have monitoring equipment, so it is difficult for scientists to study what is going on,” Stillwell said. “We are very fortunate in that respect.”

William said the primary goal of this research is to facilitate communication between scientists, policymakers, developers and the general public about the financial risk and environmental benefit of taking on such an expense.

“One of the biggest barriers to the acceptance of green infrastructures is the perception of financial risk,” William said. “People want to know if the benefit of a green roof is going to justify the cost, but that risk is mitigated by knowing when an installation will be most effective, and that is where our model comes in.”

The results of their model and risk analysis, which appear in the Journal of Sustainable Water in the Built Environment, provide a snapshot of green infrastructure performance for this particular green roof. The results from a single model do not yield a one-size-fits-all approach to green infrastructure evaluation, and William and Stillwell said that is one of the strengths of their technique. Adaptability across different technologies and environments is essential to any green infrastructure analysis.

Source: sciencedaily

Image Credit: Credit: Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

South Africa: Transnet seeks private sector investment

The privatisation of the country’s ports, railways, roads and other transport infrastructure has proved a thorny issue in South Africa over many years. Attempts to encourage private sector operation have generally produced a great deal of opposition.

Transnet’s proposals, therefore, carry political connotations. Yet at a time when the parastatal is being asked to do more and more but government finances are weak, it may have more success in gaining official backing for its policy.

In addition, its revenues have been affected by a three-year downturn in the price of the main dry bulk commodities it carries: coal and iron ore. Prices may have recovered somewhat but the outlook is still uncertain. Transnet is certainly one of the biggest companies on the African continent, although it is difficult to make a precise comparison because it is entirely state owned.

It is important to remember that one of the country’s biggest port facilities is already privately owned. Richards Bay Coal Terminal (RBCT) is owned by some of South Africa’s biggest coal mining companies, with smaller stakes held by empowerment interests.

Private sector companies also provide a wide range of logistics services, with Grindrod, in particular, developing a network covering the whole country and beyond. Grindrod is also expanding its own coal terminal at Richards Bay.

Transnet CEO Siyabonga Gama first announced the policy at the eThekwini Maritime Cluster’s annual maritime summit in Durban in early April and the approach has been fleshed out since then. Gama said that the country needs R400bn ($30.25bn) in new logistics infrastructure but Transnet was unable to pay for it alone, so at least 25% should come from the private sector, which he believed had the required capital at its disposal.

Transnet has been criticised in recent years for its high port charges in comparison with many other countries around the world. However, Gama says that his company merely prices according to market conditions, while many other ports benefit from government subsidies. Indeed, according to the World Bank Global Logistics Competitiveness Report, South Africa is regarded as more competitive than China, India, Russia or Brazil.

Focus on Durban

By far the biggest planned Transnet project is the construction of a brand new container port on the site of the old Durban International Airport, about 25km south of Durban. However, given current financial constraints and lower than expected trade volumes, there is no fixed timetable for its development. At present, Transnet is focusing on improving its infrastructure elsewhere.

Work will begin this year on deepening three berths at Durban Container Terminal Pier 2 from 12.8 metres to 16.5 metres. This will allow access for the new generation of Super Post Panamax vessels at low tide as well as high tide.

The chief executive of TNPA, Richard Vallihu, said: “The continued investment in infrastructure and modernisation of our flagship Port of Durban is pivotal in meeting the ever increasing demands of the maritime industry, in particular, the ever increasing size of container vessels pulling into our ports.”

Appointment system

The company is also seeking to improve the efficiency of its operations in ways that do not require capital outlay. For instance, at the start of April it introduced an appointment system for the delivery of containers at Durban’s Pier 1.

Haulage companies are required to book a slot for delivery in order to spread activity over the course of the week, avoid congestion and reduce allegations that drivers pay bribes to avoid the queues that build up at peak times. Transnet has set a goal of ensuring that all trucks are processed within 35 minutes.

Some freight forwarders oppose the policy, arguing that they cannot be so precise as they are subject to delays from their own customers. Transnet Port Terminals’ general manager for container operations in KwaZulu-Natal, Julani Dube, said: “We have done the necessary research and tracked all movements and transactions over the past year to know where the problems are and what is realistically achievable if we get the necessary buy-in from stakeholders to implement the container appointment system.”

Source: africanbusinessmagazine

Nedbank releases 2016 Sustainability Review

Nedbank’s 2016 Sustainability Review highlights how it contributes to the sustainable development agenda of the South Africa, with a focus on products and services, partnerships and operations.

Says Brigitte Burnett, head of sustainability for Nedbank Group: “In our experience, our sustainability effectiveness is maximised through an approach that combines a commitment to sustainable products and services, managing our own impact, and partnering with like-minded organisations and initiatives.

“The information contained in our 2016 Sustainability Review demonstrates the value that is unlocked through this approach. While we certainly aren’t there yet, it is a journey and this report shows good progress in how we have delivered positive societal impacts for our country and our clients.”

Transforming SA

At a products and services level, Burnett points to the more than R64bn worth of empowerment financing Nedbank has provided since 2009 as evidence of the bank’s dedication to transforming SA industries and businesses.

In some cases, these beneficiaries have started and grown their own businesses, while others have used it for transformational infrastructure projects – both helping to grow the economy and create jobs.

The bank also established a Green Savings Bond, which allows retail and institutional investors to not only grow their money, but also contribute to sustainable development projects like renewable energy.

Since its inception, more than R17bn has been invested into the product.

“As part of our Fair Share 2030 strategic enabler, Nedbank has also placed itself at the forefront of efforts to address the growing student accommodation crisis in South Africa,” says Burnett. “The R2.3bn we have invested in support of this vital housing sector has resulted in more than 5,000 more student beds being made available.”

Response to #FeesMustFall

The 2016 Sustainability Review offers evidence of Nedbank’s commitment to positive education outcomes and how the bank has responded to the Fees Must Fall campaign.

Burnett points specifically to Nedbank’s partnership with the Nedbank Mogale Empowerment Trust, which invested R100m in the MTN Zakhele Futhi scheme – the dividends received will be used to benefit black students across the country as well as black supplier development.

The review also discloses detail on investments aimed at socioeconomic upliftment and support. For example, the bank’s main CSI arm, the Nedbank Foundation, has invested R141m into a range of social projects across its key focus areas of education, health and social development.

The bank also provided more than R100m in drought support over the past financial year, including working capital for its agriculture clients and donations towards boreholes, animal feed and bottled water.

Reducing its carbon footprint

Closer to home, Nedbank remains committed to managing the sustainability impacts of its own operations and staff. Since 2010, Nedbank has been carbon neutral and, in 2016, it further reduced its overall direct carbon footprint by more than 6%.

Across the group, the bank remains focused on good water stewardship and continued its water usage minimisation trend by reducing water consumption across its operations by a further 1.1% in 2016.

The full 2016 Nedbank Sustainability Review is available for download at www.nedbank.co.za. It is a supplementary report to the Nedbank Group Integrated Report.

Source: bizcommunity