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Agri SA to potentially change to Pty Ltd

Agri SA’s intention to change from a civic to a Pty (Ltd) organisation was so that it could continue to offer sustainable service delivery to the South African agriculture sector.

This was according to Johannes Möller, Agri SA president, who was speaking at the 2017 Agri North West congress. Möller said that the decision had been preceded by in-depth consultation and research.

“The objective is to amend the organisation’s constitution to make it possible for Agri SA to change to a non-profit company,” he said.

According to Möller, the agricultural landscape in South Africa had changed to such an extent that it would be foolish to maintain the current status quo.

“The organisation will eventually consist of a number of entities such as a general business chamber. This chamber will provide for Agri SA’s provincial bodies,” said Möller.

Provincial Agri SA members would own the general chamber as members, and not as shareholders. An operational chamber, amongst others, was also in the planning phase.

This chamber would be owned and driven by commodity organisations, such as Grain SA.

The proposed corporate chamber would provide for integration with the rest of the agricultural value chain.

“It does not mean that Agri SA is planning to start an agribusiness. But closer cooperation with the value chain is of the essence for long-term sustainability,” Möller explained.

Omri van Zyl, Agri SA CEO, added that the organisation also needed to create a litigation fund, with the proposed initial amount for the fund at R38 million.

“Our litigation focus now is on land reform and the threat to property rights. We also will need the fund to tackle issues such as fracking,” he said.

Source: farmersweekly

Coal mining destroying arable land

BELFAST, Mpumalanga – Experts say mining across Mpumalanga is damaging land that’s vital to food security. Grain SA has warned that this year may be the first time in seven years that South Africa will be a net importer of maize.

An expert has warned that mining in Mpumalanga is damaging land that is vital to food security.Mpumalanga is at the heart of South Africa’s coal production.

Mining coal acidifies the surrounding water and soil, meaning plants can’t grow, even long after the mines have closed down.

Louis Snyman, an environmental and mining attorney at the Centre for Applied Legal Studies, has warned that if this continues, the landscape will be left scarred and barren.

“What will happen at the end of the day this water that will be given to mines will be taken directly from farmers which is a huge issue when it comes to food security and when it comes to very fertile arable land becoming wastelands,” said Snyman.

Source: enca


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