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Transport Dept urged to construct railway lines in rural areas

The Department of Transport has been asked to look at ways to construct railway lines in rural areas to increase integration with other modes of transport in rural communities.

This comes after the department conducted public consultations on the National Rail policy in Mpumalanga, part of a nation-wide process.

Participants have urged the department to ensure that commuters who are using trains are safe at all times.

The Director for Rail Policy Development in the department, Hlengiwe Sayd, says participants also urged the department to ensure that commuters who are using trains are safe at all times.

“The other issue that was raised that we agreed on but then we haven’t really touched much on but we are going to address in response to stakeholders, is the issue of rural rail passenger transport.”

Mpumalanga is one of the provinces that are producing coal in the country. Most of the coal is transported by trucks.

The South African National Taxi Council says it fully supports the establishment of the National Rail Policy

Some of the delegates who attended the Stakeholder Consultations on Green Paper on the National Rail Policy in White River raised concerns that coal trucks continue to damage the province’s road network.

They believe this should be addressed by the envisaged national rail policy. However, others are sceptical as they believe a number of truck drivers will lose their jobs if the coal is transported by rail.

Provincial Secretary of South Africa Transport and Allied Workers Union (Satawu), David Khambule says they support the idea that coal should be transported using trains but they will not be delighted to see people losing their jobs.

“If it happens that there is a reduction of trucks on the roads, surely this will affect us negatively as a trade union because some of our members will lose jobs, but I don’t think we should encourage that.”

The South African National Taxi Council says it is fully supports the establishment of the National Rail Policy.

Santaco’s Secretary in Mpumalanga, Sphiwe Sibanyoni says the consultation has assisted them to get clarity on other issue regarding the rail sector.

Source: sabc


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Notorious Moloto Road now part of Sanral network

One of South Africa’s most dangerous roads, the Moloto Road which runs north of Pretoria and passes through three provinces, has been incorporated into the South African National Roads Agency (Sanral) road network. The government gazette announcing the incorporation was published on 29 July. Print Send to Friend 0 0 “This has given Sanral the go-ahead to make this deadly road safer. We are now responsible for the upgrading of the 93 km road – the R573 – which stretches from Mpumalanga/Gauteng border to Marble Hall in Limpopo,” said Sanral northern region project manager Madoda Mthembu.

With thousands of commuters using the road daily, the poor surface condition coupled with irresponsible driver behaviour has resulted in a high rate of crashes and fatalities along the route. “As the road traverses three different provinces – managed by three different road authorities – there were difficulties in maintaining it. We are of one mind with the Minister of Transport that this road needs to be made safer for its users urgently, and that this requires a single road authority to ensure sustainable maintenance to do so,” Mthembu said.

Government has set aside just over R1-billion to improve the road. The project involves upgrading the road to accommodate existing and future traffic, improved access roads and routine road maintenance such as pothole repairs, the cleaning of storm water culverts and the updating of road signs and road markings. According to Madoda, routine road maintenance started the same day the road was transferred to Sanral.

The rehabilitation phase will kick-off once contractors have been procured the design and environmental impact assessments have been done. This is estimated to be during the 2017/18 financial year. The project will be completed approximately 36 months thereafter and forms part of Sanral’s non-toll portfolio – meaning the road will not be tolled

Source: engineeringnews


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