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Cape Town Tourism will continue to build on the city’s tourism success

Cape Town Tourism’s service level agreement (SLA) has been expanded for another year by the City of Cape Town. The partnership will incur ongoing success and development enhancements in areas of responsibility, providing tourism experiences across the greater Cape Town to the benefit of the local tourism industry.
The agreement has led to extensive collaborative projects, particularly within the areas of responsible tourism, universal access in tourism, visitor safety and in counteracting seasonality in the sector, in addition to the primary responsibilities of tourism marketing and visitor services.

Providing detailed information for visitors

In practice, this means marketing the city’s attractions, experiences, accommodation and people across a variety of platforms including digital, social media and traditional media. Cape Town Tourism provides a wealth of detailed information for visitors to explore the city more, to ensure that their experiences are consistently world-class.

Cape Town Tourism also represents the city at trade shows and on other trade marketing platforms, to showcase what’s on offer and attract more visitors. This, with a view to expand the market locally, regionally and globally to key markets, which include the United States, Europe, the Middle East and Far East, as well as on the rest of the African continent ¬ – this includes promoting Cape Town as a destination and also identifying opportunities and potential partnerships.

Cape Town Tourism is a membership organisation comprising almost 1,300-member businesses, which include all tourism or tourism related businesses ranging from SMMEs to large multinational organisations.

Promoting and growing the tourism industry

As the city’s primary tourism organisation, Cape Town Tourism conducts extensive research into the economic value of tourism as well as visitor perceptions.

“We have long enjoyed working with the honorable mayor and her team as well as all those who represent the tourism industry in Cape Town in promoting this fantastic destination and ensuring that all expectations are met and exceeded for our visitors; it’s an honour that this working relationship is set to continue,” says Enver Duminy, CEO, Cape Town Tourism.

“Cape Town Tourism is doing vital work in growing and promoting an important industry that employs thousands of residents each year. The city and its tourism partners are working together to enhance our tourism offering and build a resilient industry that attracts tourists from the rest of Africa and abroad all year round. This agreement will assist us in building on the success of the past few years while the industry supports skills development for our residents and drives economic inclusion for all our communities,”
says Patricia de Lille, executive mayor, City of Cape Town.Cape Town Tourism encourages locals to extensively explore the city and to make use of the city’s resources on offer, and treat visitors well to ensure the ongoing growth of the tourism sector.

Source: bizcommunity

Making gas out of Africa’s waste

What we may see as waste, others see as a resource.

Clean Energy Africa is one such company producing gas and fuels out of trash.
One of its plants in Cape Town, worth $30 million, aims to consume 560 tons of solid waste per day. This is about seven percent of the total waste the six million residents of Cape Town produce daily.
“We are trying to be a landfill alternative which means we take waste from various sources, bring the waste in, clean it up, produce gas, produce fuels,” Egmont Ottermann, Clean Energy Africa’s CEO, told CNN.
Companies such as waste removal company Wastemart already pays to deliver its waste to the plant.
“We see the plant in Cape Town as a springboard for developing more plants in the future,” added Ottermann.
“It’s where we have to get things right, it’s our blueprint, it’s the first one where we get the formula for building and operating it right.”

How it works

The waste used for fuel has to be organic matter. It is piped into huge vats, where bacteria converts it to natural gas. The biogas generated is then cleaned and piped to the market, either as methane rich gas or liquid CO2 rich gas.
“The Cape Town market is looking for alternatives to its current energy sources, so alternatives to heavy fuels, coal, LPG, diesel; and it fits beautifully in that,” said Silvia Schollenberger from AFROX, one of the main gas suppliers in Cape Town and a Clean Energy Africa shareholder.
There are plans for similar projects in at least three other cities in South Africa, and eventually across Africa.
Source: edition.cnn

First Radisson Red hotel coming to V&A

Cape Town’s V&A Waterfront will soon boast Africa’s first Radisson Red hotel. The hotel, which is expected to be opened later this year, will employ more than 100 people.

The development has been described as a welcome boost for the city’s job creation goals.

The Radisson Red hotel, part of the Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group, is a unique structure inspired by art, music and fashion. Curator Dale Simpson said the hotel would shake South Africa’s hospitality industry with its bold new philosophy. Simpson said it would offer an exuberant and unique take on modern hospitality.

“We are excited to be situated in the wonderful city of Cape Town,” he said. “As we build towards developing in September, we will very much engage with the local talent in Cape Town.” Simpson said the hotel was built following studies which showed that travellers were looking for quality and genuine experiences.

He said the desire to just see the big ticket items when visiting a destination was no longer the main attraction.

“Travellers want to explore the destination from a lifestyle point of view, they want to know where the best coffee is served, where the local food markets operate and where the most exciting restaurants in the neighbourhood are.

”The drive of localisation continues. At Radisson Red, we look forward to sharing all our knowledge and foraging all of our areas to offer guests that genuine quality experience in Cape Town.”

Simpson said the V&A Waterfront, together with leading architects, had transformed six grain silos into modern sustainable spaces.

“Radisson Red embraces freedom, flexibility, fun and will bring these elements to life through a whole new type of guest experience.

“We’re a city hotel for an ageless expressive crown, and by occupying Silo Six, we’re right in the heart of the bustling Waterfront, amidst the city’s vibrant nightlife, only 25 minutes from Cape Town International Airport,and all the while boasting Instagram-worthy harbour and mountain views.”

He said the V&A development followed successful launches in Brussels and Minneapolis, with Campinas and Glasgow also expected to follow suit.

He said that adding to the buzz would be the highly-anticipated Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Zeitz Mocca), set to open in September.

“Art is always at the heart of Red and our dynamic design is both inspiring and functional.

“So it makes sense that we’d be neighbouring the world’s largest museum dedicated to showcasing contemporary art from Africa and its diaspora.”

Simpson added however, that beyond the hotel’s dynamic location that would prove attractive to guests, the hotel would also boast trends and lifestyle of the ageless millennial, tapping into modern, high-tech travellers.

“In addition to our 252 contemporary rooms and fully equipped gym, the hotel will house four events and games studios for up to 90 guests, ideal for hosting high-octane meetings and social occasions.

It probably goes without saying, but guests will be able to access super-fast free wi-fi and 24/7 entertainment tech throughout the property.

Additional good news for all animal-lovers is that all “fur babies” of 8kg or under are welcome to stay at the hotel too.”

Source: iol 

Check for water leaks, says water-wary Cape Town

The City of Cape Town has urged residents to check their water bills and meters regularly after a resident who was named and shamed for excessive water consumption discovered a massive underground leak on his property.

“It has made people sit up and take note,” said mayoral spokesperson Zara Nicholson.

On Monday, the city released the names of the streets where 100 properties the city identified as having recorded the highest water usage are located.

Nicholson said the tactic is having the desired effect because the owner of the property on Haywood Road, Crawford, which topped the list at 702 000 litres of water used in January, has since contacted the city to report the leak.

In addition to the massive water bill, he will also have to foot the bill for the repairs as the leak is on private property within a boundary wall. The city is only responsible for piping beyond boundary walls.

The city’s responsibility is the approximately 11 000 km of water pipe lines, 650 000 water connections, and 9 500 km of sewer lines not on private property.

Residents’ responsibility

According to Nicholson many people do not even know there is a problem because they don’t read their water bills or even check that they are being billed correctly.

The municipality has also sent letters to 20 000 other people querying their high water consumption and suggesting that they should check for leaks.

“Switch off the water and look on the water meter to see if it is still turning,” she said.

If it is still turning, an underground leak is likely.

“It is their responsibility to monitor the bills and identify the leaks and have [them] repaired.

“The numbers are there and are accurate,” said Nicholson.

Residents from low-income households are allowed to apply for free plumbing services through their local municipal services centre, in line with policies that protect the indigent if they cannot afford to fix leaks themselves.

120 days of water left

The “top 100” list initially contained the details of people who had already declared a dispute with the city, so their addresses were left off Monday’s list.

“The people that are on the list are people who clearly haven’t monitored their account,” she said.

“There are people who feel they can pay the fine. There are people who only found out by seeing their street in the newspaper.”

In Monday’s statement, Mayor Patricia De Lille warned that the city only had 121 days of water left.

Consumption was at 837 million litres of collective use per day compared to the target of 700 million litres per day.

“We have 121 days left of usable water in our dams,” said De Lille at a briefing to drive home the crisis facing the city.

De Lille plans to write to environment MEC Anton Bredell to have the situation declared a disaster.

On Monday dam levels were at 33%, down from 1.5% a week ago. The last 10% of a dam’s water is not usable.

Source: engineeringnews

Climate change could leave South African tourism high and dry

Towards the end of each year hundreds of thousands of people escape dark, cold, rainy winters in Europe and North America for a break in sunny South Africa“.

Many are drawn by the country’s wide array of outdoor attractions: nature reserves, beaches and adventure activities like skydiving and water sports. All of these are reliant on prolonged pleasant weather conditions. And, for now, South Africa delivers just that.

But climate change could place the country’s booming tourism sector – which contributes more than R100 billion to the GDP each year – at risk.

A range of research we have conducted suggests that climate change will badly compromise the sector. In one province, the Eastern Cape, sea levels will rise so much by 2050 that properties in popular tourist haunts might be flooded if adaptation measures are not implemented.

Weather changes are inevitable

The sub-Saharan region will likely be hit hard by climate change. It will experience temperature increases above the average global rate. Extreme weather events will become more common and the region’s rainfall patterns are set to change. Some areas will experience increased rainfall and a heightened flood risk, while others are projected to experience a decrease in rainfall and become more drought prone.

South Africa and other countries on the continent such as Mozambique, Morocco and Egypt, whose tourism sectors also rely on good weather, need to act urgently to navigate the choppy waters of climate change.

Mapping the problem

These concerns led us to initiate a pilot study that explored climate change threats to the tourism sector in two small coastal Eastern Cape towns. The study used Digital Elevation Models that map future sea levels relative to the land surface. These maps explored the potential impact of rising sea levels to the towns’ accommodation establishments by 2050 and then again by 2100.

Our results indicate that the worst effects will be experienced by 2050. The models suggest that 23 guesthouses which immediately border the coastline and one town’s canal will be flooded by this time.

We also calculated the Tourism Climatic Index scores for the two towns based on climate data from the past 30 years. The index incorporates a range of meteorological variables which influence human comfort and aesthetic pleasure. This serves as a measure of a location’s climatic suitability for tourism in future.

We also interviewed people: 52 tourists and 53 accommodation establishment owners. The owners expressed a significant concern for tourists’ comfort in changing climatic conditions. Many told us they’d installed air conditioning units and organised indoor activities to deal with higher temperatures or rainfall. But rising sea levels were perceived as far too distant a problem to require immediate intervention. Many of the owners didn’t believe it would pose a threat within their lifetime.

Widening the lens

After we’d completed the pilot study we initiated a broad-based analysis of Tourism Climatic Index scores which included 18 locations distributed relatively evenly across South Africa.

This study confirmed the widely held perception that South Africa has particularly suitable weather conditions for tourism. All of the locations returned annual scores within the international classification of “Excellent” to “Ideal”.

For most locations, climates are most suitable in spring and autumn: winters are too cold and summers too hot. Cape Town is particularly suitable for tourism summer, which is confirmed by peak tourist numbers during this season. The scores were low in winter because of a combination of cold temperatures, persistent cloud cover and a large number of rainy days.

The study also explored the factors within the index which contributed to lowering a location’s score. For all 18 locations, the factor was either rainfall or thermal comfort – how hot or cold a place was.

Although this model confirms that the climate is currently suitable for tourism, projected changes in these meteorological variables are bad news for South Africa’s tourism sector. Climate change will not only shift seasons, changing the start date of spring and summer and extending the duration of summer. It will also alter rainfall patterns and daily temperatures. These factors will result in a reduced climate suitability for tourism. So what can tourism bodies and individual establishments like hotels or guesthouses do to mitigate against these changes?

There is room for action

An improved understanding of how climate change threatens tourism is a good thing, no matter how gloomy our findings look. Understanding can improve the sector’s capacity for effective adaptation and mitigation.

Accurate, high resolution forecasts of specific climate change threats allow for well targeted measures that improve the chances of sustainable tourism – whether it’s at the level of individual establishments or the whole sector nationally.

Individual establishments that operate from coastal premises could, for instance, build solid retaining walls, relocate to higher land and develop an emergency evacuation plan. They can also make improvements indoors to increase comfort during periods of bad weather, like installing air conditioners or organising indoor entertainment.

Nationally, the government could develop quicker responses to flood affected regions. This would allow tourism establishments to get back up and running quickly after a climatic event like a flood. Tourism authorities should work with forecasters to understand weather patterns better – then, armed with accurate scientific information they can draw tourists to the most suitable locations for a particular time of year.

Source: sowetanlive

SA Taxi secures R300m in funding to take on Uber

SA Taxi has secured R300-million in funding from Futuregrowth Asset Management, which it will use to provide financing to the company’s Zebra Cabs owner-driver scheme.

SA Taxi is South Africa’s largest financier of minibus taxis. It acquired Zebra Cabs metered taxis in 2015, motivated by the need to expand its business activities into adjacent markets.

The aim of SA Taxi’s newest venture is to revive the country’s floundering metered taxi cab industry, says SA Taxi capital markets director Mark Herskovits.

“In South Africa, the industry is characterised by an old, poorly maintained fleet of vehicles and a lack of trust and transparency in pricing.

“We feel that there is an opportunity to revolutionise the industry and also offer a suitable alternative to Uber, which is doing a great job at disrupting this sector.”

The new venture will see SA Taxi, in conjunction with Futuregrowth, offer owner-driver entrepreneurs who do not want to operate minibus taxis and who may not have a credit record that provides access to vehicle financing, the means to purchase a metered taxi, along with additional support in running their small business.

“As a long-standing investor in SA Taxi, on behalf of our clients, we have witnessed how the company has become a pioneer of innovation in an industry that poses many challenges,” says Futuregrowth investment analyst Gershwin Long.

“Add to this the established relationships held with industry regulators, and the company’s credit vetting and rating processes, and we have every confidence in the business, the business model and the management team. This leaves us with no doubt that the company will be able to revolutionise the metered taxi industry in the same manner, thereby offering a sound investment opportunity.”

Long says much of this revolution is already evident in the manner in which SA Taxi has overhauled and modernised Zebra Cabs’ operations.

“Our research shows that the average age of the metered taxi fleet in South Africa is five years, which impacts the profitability of metered taxi operators. However, SA Taxi has upgraded the Zebra Cabs fleet with just under 300 ToyotaCorollas, all equipped with GPS, Bluetooth, leather seats and external cameras.”

In addition to this, customers now also have a choice of mechanisms to book a taxi, either through the traditional call centre or hailing options, or via an app or Web portal. Various payment methods are also available, including cash, cards or mobile e-wallet transactions.

The company has also partnered with corporates in Johannesburg to meet their transport needs on a contract basis, securing a presence in a market within which Uber cannot compete.

According to Long, all of these elements help Zebra Cabs owner-drivers to be more efficient and profitable, which makes it more likely that SA Taxi will recoup loans and make a profit.

This initial funding is earmarked for expansion over a two-year period, with a primary focus on operations in Johannesburg.

“We will consider seeking additional funding sooner if required, but we first want to build scale in the key area of Johannesburg to achieve critical mass, before expanding operations to Cape Town and Durban. Our long-term goal is to have 3 000 Zebra Cabs on the road by 2020,” notes Herskovits.

Source: engineeringnews

A future R14bn green village near Cape Town to get ‘lifestyle centre’

SWISATEC, the firm of architects and project managers for Blue Rock Village, has announced a new multimillion-rand addition to the village —the Santa Luzia lifestyle centre — which it says will embrace the “live, work and play” ethos.

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Earlier this year, Swisatec disclosed plans for the construction of what is dubbed Africa’s first green village — a R14bn green village in Somerset West, near some of the Western Cape’s popular wine farms.

The village, thought to be the first development of its kind in SA and on the continent, constitutes an upgrade of the popular Blue Rock Resort.

Construction was expected to start in August, with Swisatec forecasting that the project would take eight to 10 years to complete.

The Blue Rock Village would become one of the biggest mixed-use developments in Cape Town. Plans for the village include medical centres, boutiques, schools and colleges, nurseries, restaurants and cafés.

Swisatec said the addition of the Santa Luzia Lifestyle centre would add more value to the village and bring an “exclusive lifestyle”.

The Santa Luzia Lifestyle Centre will be a multifunctional centre boasting 14,000m² floor space, a seven-storey building 600m long, with a 10,000m² exhibition street designed for hosting conferences, exhibitions and interactive events such as local produce markets, product launches, and concerts or music festivals.

Lukas Reichmuth, founder and director of Blue Rock Village, said Santa Luzia lifestyle centre would house boutique shops, a doctors’ centre, clinics and professional office space.

Various hubs would be located in the centre, including The Dollar House — the financial hub — offering high-end office space to law firms, financial institutions such as banks, consultants, and other financial professions. Also included would be a wellness spa and sports centre.

Linked to the Santa Luzia lifestyle centre would be the multimillion-rand five-star Blue Rock Hotel and Conferencing centre, said Reichmuth.

The hotel and conferencing centre was envisioned to have about 150 luxury rooms, 30 condominiums, conference capacity for more than 500 delegates, high-end restaurants, a bar and lounge areas. It was expected that the conferencing centre would host similar events to those held at Cape Town International Convention Centre and Sandton Convention Centre.

Construction of the Santa Luzia Lifestyle centre was expected to begin in 2017.

According to Francois Viruly, a property economist and associate professor at the University of Cape Town, mixed-use property developments were growing in popularity because of their ability to create a “lifestyle”.
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R290m home: German couple ditch lavish coastal towns for Cape Town

Cape Town – They had their eyes set on the sought-after seaside lifestyle in Ibiza or Saint-Tropez, but their hearts went with Cape Town instead.

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This is how it all started for the young German couple who forked out R290m, the highest price ever for a house in South Africa and Africa.”They buy beautiful homes around the world and it is the first time they bought a house in South Africa,” estate agent Adrien Epstein, who sold the property, told Fin24.The couple were looking to buy a holiday home in Ibiza, an island in the Mediterranean Sea in Spain, or Saint-Tropez, a coastal town on the French Riviera.However, it was an award-winning house nestled in Bantry Bay along Cape Town’s swanky Atlantic Seaboard that they fell in love with.The fully furnished, three-storey, home includes five bedrooms, three guest bedrooms, two staff bedrooms and eight garages; the deal also included two luxury cars.

“There were six luxury cars in the garage,” said Epstein from Dogon Group Properties, specialists in luxury real estates along the Atlantic Seaboard.

He recalled how late one evening, while negotiating the deal on the telephone, the sellers from New York jokingly threw into the deal a Porsche Cayenne and an Aston Martin DB9.

“It was all done in jest and the buyers had a good laugh and accepted it.”

Epstein had mixed feelings about being part of the record transaction.

“It felt similar to any other transaction. I never focus on the numbers.” However, he also added: “It was very exhilarating. The buyers were lovely, fun and a young family.”

He said a combination of factors such as size, location, natural beauty and extraordinary views makes the Bantry Bay family home so unique.

The home, roughly laid out in the shape of a horseshoe, boasts 360 degree views of Lion’s Head, Table Mountain, the Twelve Apostles, Clifton, the Atlantic Ocean, Bantry Bay, Robben Island as well as the lights of Fresnaye and Sea Point all the way to Mouille Point and beyond.

It has a level garden and terrace with wraparound swimming pool and VIP security. The 2 800m2home is also flanked by 5 200m2 of vacant land on either side.

The house, known as OVD 919, has won numerous local and international awards, including most recently the popular vote category in the international 2016 Architizer A+Award for private houses over 500m2, as well as the 2016 Lafarge Artevia Decorative Concrete Awards in the category: House with a view.

It was built two years ago and designed by architects SAOTA.

“The design was driven by the need for a contemporary, sculptural, open plan home that would respond to its dramatic setting on a ridge above Cape Town’s Atlantic Seaboard,” Tamaryn Fourie, senior associate at SAOTA, told Fin24.

She said as a key objective to all the group’s designs, the connection between indoor and outdoor spaces was prioritised.

“By creating courtyards and inset spaces, the design is rich and porous. The large gallery type spaces are inspired by the magnetism of the site and its ever-present backdrop of the mountains and the sea.”

Fourie pointed out the home features one of the largest domestic landscaped walls in South Africa, and has a skylight over the garage which is a water feature.

“Unusually, the most dominant finish in the house is off-shutter ‘white’ concrete which was custom designed.”

She noted that a distinct feature – which is highly visible from the Clifton beaches – is the 20m long unsupported concrete slab which was constructed using an innovative engineering solution.

Stefan Antoni, director of SAOTA’s award-winning architecture practice, said the price tag of the home is an accolade to the team of architects and builders who realised this unique design.

“This record fetching price gives recognition to the value of architecture that is powerful in form, refined in detailing and yet sensitive to Cape Town’s natural beauty,” she added.

What does this sale mean to Cape Town’s property sector?

“We all know why people love Cape Town, but this kind of investor confidence is very encouraging. It bodes very well for Cape Town and South African investment,” Dogon Group Properties CEO Denise Dogon told Fin24.

Cape Town’s Atlantic seaboard with its stunning views, white sandy Blue Flag beaches, rocky coastline and popular hangouts is a trendy spot for wealthy individuals.

Dogon said the demand for and amount of interest in the Atlantic Seaboard is impressive.

“This ranges from investor interest in a R2m studio apartment across the whole spectrum of property, including apartments and houses that have huge asking prices. All property on the Atlantic Seaboard is in demand.”

In May Dogon registered over R600m in property sales – with R550m on the Atlantic Seaboard alone – bringing total sales to over R1bn for the first half of 2016.

Dogon Group Properties opened their first office on the Atlantic Seaboard in 2002 and recently launched a southern suburbs office, which has already achieved the highest priced sale for a residential estate in Constantia.

Their expansion plans include opening a branch in Sandton later this year.

Based on data from Lightstone, Cape Town tops the list of South Africa’s top ten suburbs with seven of these suburbs, including the top Atlantic Seaboard suburbs of Clifton, Bantry Bay, Camps Bay, Fresnaye and Llandudno along with Bishopscourt and Constantia in the southern suburbs.

Only three Johannesburg suburbs are in the top ten list namely Sandhurst in Sandton, Westcliff and Dunkeld.

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Source: fin24


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SA named best in Africa for business tourism events

Cape Town – The number one city in Africa for business tourism events is Cape Town, according to the International Congress and Convention Association Country and City rankings released in May 2016.

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The city has once again retained its number 1 position in Africa for hosting association meetings, with 48 international association meetings hosted across the continent Cape Town has managed to retain its position ahead of Johannesburg, Marrakech and Nairobi – each hosting 17 meetings.

Corne Koch, Head of Wesgro’s Cape Town & Western Cape Convention Bureau accepted a Members Choice Award for Wesgro for a third year running saying, “Over the past year, the team has secured 17 conference bids with an estimated delegate attendance of 28 280 and estimated economic impact of R374m for the province.”

The ICCA rankings are seen as one of the most important benchmarks used in the international meetings market for identifying and comparing destinations.

“Over the past five years, the estimated economic impact of the conference bids secured by Wesgro’s Cape Town & Western Cape Convention Bureau is R1.5bn for the province,” says Judy Lain, Wesgro’s Chief Marketing Officer Tourism, “making business tourism events such as association meetings an important economic contributor and job creator for the region.”

The bureau secured its largest bid to date, winning the World Ophthalmology Congress for 2020, with an estimated delegate attendance of 15 000 and estimated economic impact of R224m.

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Cape Town is Africa’s green economic hub

Cape Town – The presence of delegations from 13 of the world’s leading clean technology clusters at Africa Utility Week, which is running at the Cape Town International Conference Centre from May 17-19, was held up on Tuesday as confirmation of the Mother City’s position as a leading green economic hub.

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GreenCape said in a statement on Tuesday that it was hosting its International Cleantech Network (ICN) counterparts at the event, along with international business delegations from the Netherlands, Denmark, France, Germany, Sweden, Austria, Italy, Belgium and Canada. The statement from the government-funded, industry-led initiative that supports the development of renewable energy in the province said this would reinforce the Western Cape’s position as the green economic hub of Africa.

With members in Europe, North America, Asia and Africa, the ICN is a platform for cross-regional green economic development that works with business, academia and government to create opportunities for investment in clean technologies.

“Africa Utility Week offers these ICN members and investors a unique opportunity to network with African power and water utility professionals and local service providers,” the GreenCape statement added.

It added that the visitors would meet Cape Town officials who were attending a workshop on ICN and the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, a network of the world’s megacities who are taking action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, of which Cape Town is an observer city.

Greencape quoted the Western Cape’s MEC for economic opportunities, Alan Winde, as saying: “The Western Cape government has set itself the goal of becoming the greenest region in Africa.”

To achieve this, he said, the municipality was working to create a conducive environment for private sector investment into this space, adding that GreenCape and its network had been exceptional partners in this regard.

Winde said that investments of more than R17 billion had been made in renewable energy projects in the Western Cape over the past five years, creating in excess of 2 000 jobs.

“Here in the Western Cape, we are producing and selling the energy of the future, and we are proud to share our successes with you through this event [Africa Utility Week]. Building a green energy economy is not only the right thing to do. In the Western Cape, it now also makes business sense.”

In addition to the investments in renewable energy, GreenCape said, R680m of direct investments had been made in the proposed Atlantis GreenTech Special Economic Zone over the past five years.

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