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Coca-Cola’s Investment in Cape Town Water Fund

Coca-Cola’s investment in the Greater Cape Town Water Fund is recharging Cape Town’s largest aquifer by empowering women to clear water-intensive alien plants.

The Coca-Cola Foundation (TCCF)Coca-Cola Peninsula Beverages (PenBev), and The Nature Conservancy (TNC), along with other partners, today celebrate the completion of a successful pilot project for The Greater Cape Town Water Fund. As a founding investor in the Water Fund, TCCF’s investment of US$150,000 has helped to clear 64 hectares of invasive plants in the Atlantis area of the Western Cape, and empowered 12 females through skills transfer and employment.

The Greater Cape Town Water Fund is working with authorities, the private sector, NGOs and communities to restore the Atlantis aquifer, Cape Town’s largest. By December 2019, the Water Fund will have replenished at least 10,000,000 litres of water to the Atlantis aquifer by clearing 64 hectares of invasive plants in the aquifer’s primary recharge zone. Invasive plants, such as Australian Acacias, consume more water than the native Fynbos vegetation, limiting rainwater recharge to the aquifer. The Fund employs local female job seekers to clear these invasive plants.

“Water Funds are unique financing vehicles that invest in innovative and pioneering initiatives to manage water supplies. We are very excited about our investment in this Water Fund in particular as it will have a positive impact on more than 70,000 people in Witzands and Silverstroom as well as alleviate pressure and increase water security across Cape Town’s water supply system, which serves 4 million people,” explains Dorcas Onyango, Head of Sustainability for Coca-Cola Southern & East Africa.

Over time, the Atlantis aquifer pilot project will be scaled up to priority catchments in the Western Cape Water Supply System to secure water supply. By restoring natural vegetation cover at a large scale, the Water Fund will help catalyze a significant increase in aquifer recharge and help boost water availability.

“Alien plant invasions in the Greater Cape Town region’s catchments are responsible for the loss of 38 million liters of water each year, equivalent to meeting the water requirements of Cape Town for two months. The Greater Cape Town Water Fund works with partners to control thirsty invader plants, restore strategic wetlands and riverine areas, and thereby address these water losses,” said Louise Stafford, The Nature Conservancy’s Water Fund Project Director for South Africa. With a continous need to remove alien plant species, a sustainable business opportunity has been developed for local female entrepreneurs, supported through The Water Fund.

The Nature Conservancy has 29 Water Funds in operation and 30 more in development — all of which are designed to protect the upstream and aquifer water source regions that provide water to large urban centres.

Coca-Cola’s response to the crisis in Cape Town, in addition to investment in the Greater Cape Town Water Fund, includes finding alternatives to municipal water for its beverage production, as well as the provisioning of emergency bottled water supplies. “Over the past 11 years, Coca-Cola Peninsula Beverages has reduced the use of water dramatically in the manufacturing process and has one of the best water usage ratios across the Coca-Cola system. Our promise of caring for the communities we service as well as the environment remains of paramount importance to us as a business. We are very proud to be part of the Cape Town Water Fund which has made great progress in such a short space of time,” explains Priscilla Urquhart, Public Affairs and Communications Manager for Coca-Cola Peninsula Beverages.

With water stress and scarcity being the new normal for many regions across South Africa, The Nature Conservancy calls on all partners and other investors like The Coca-Cola Company, to invest in these strategic investment models to manage water resources and optimize water supply.

Zero Mass Water: Sunshine + Air = Water

According to the US Geological Survey, more than 99.7% of the Earth’s water is unusable by humans and most other living things, either because it is saline or trapped in glaciers. This leaves a tiny portion of accessible freshwater for humans to use. To add to the pressure, South Africa is a semi-arid region with a mean annual precipitation of 497mm per year, just over half the global average of 860mm per year making it the 30th driest country in the world according to the World Wildlife Fund. In addition, research has indicated that total precipitation in the region has declined, and southern Africa’s water resources are likely to decrease further as a result of climate change and rapidly increasing population growth and urbanization The current water crisis in Cape Town is testimony to this with Day Zero still looming for the city into 2019, and water security very much in the balance. Enter Zero Mass Water’s SOURCE Hydropanels: a world-first technology which uses sunlight and air to make safe, pure drinking water.

Powered entirely by solar, SOURCE extracts pure water vapour from the air and converts it into liquid water similar to distilled. This water is mineralised with magnesium and calcium before being delivered directly to a tap. Completely infrastructure-independent, SOURCE makes water without any external electric or water input. This significant advancement in drinking water access is made possible through the combination of thermodynamics, materials science, and controls technology.

Developed by Zero Mass Water founder and CEO Cody Friesen, a materials scientist and associate professor at Arizona State University, SOURCE utilises an ultra-absorbent material that collects water from the air around it in even arid conditions. Producing an average of 3-5 litres of water per panel per day, the Hydropanels are built in arrays designed to meet the drinking water needs of each application. For developers and architects incorporating smart-home technology into their designs and offerings, SOURCE is a differentiating feature of any modern home. Providing drinking water security and quality without any environmental consequence, SOURCE Hydropanels are vital for every resilient home and community.

For the hospitality sector, SOURCE adds value when built into scalable arrays. The SOURCE Hydropanels are modular and can be aggregated to meet the drinking water needs of a hotel, lodge or office building. “With the high-cost and environmental damage of bottled water, hotels and attractions need a better choice for their guests. Our system provides a daily supply of delicious, high-quality drinking water while offsetting the carbon footprint of bottled water.

With renewable water made on-site, SOURCE offers an infrastructure-free and cost-saving alternative to bottled water, without the hassle or logistics of purchasing and delivering it,” says Friesen. With the technology installed for emergency situations, in municipalities that have failing infrastructures, and homes for families looking for a better drinking water choice, the scope of applications for SOURCE Hydropanels in South Africa is seemingly endless, and will certainly go a long way to ensuring water security for all.

Load shedding highly likely this winter – energy expert

The possibility of load shedding by Eskom in South Africa this winter is larger than the Day Zero water crisis that engulfed Cape Town until last month, independent energy expert Ted Blom told Fin24 on Wednesday.

Eskom, however, told Parliament in April that South Africa’s electricity grid is “stable” as the country heads into the winter months when electricity usage rises.

Eskom told Fin24 on Wednesday that load shedding this winter is not likely, as it implemented plans to manage a shift in plant performance and coal-stock levels.

Blom, however, said Cape Town’s Day Zero was avoided by people starting to save water ahead of time. Eskom, on the other hand, only sent out tenders for emergency coal supplies last week after permission was obtained from National Treasury.

Although Eskom’s new board is trying to follow compliance in the process, Blom claims the power utility’s management should have foreseen six months ago already that there would be a problem with enough coal supplies for the winter electricity spike.

Apart from his own knowledge of the industry, said Blom, his claims are substantiated by reliable sources at Eskom.

“Chances are more than 50% that there will be load shedding this winter. Where is Eskom going to find coal? Coal does not just fall out of heaven. You have to mine it. You need skilled miners and equipment for that,” he said.

He suspects Eskom has a coal shortfall of about a million tonnes per month and is of the view that, even when all is in place to obtain more coal supplies, it will take three to five months to catch up on the backlog – in other words, during the winter period.

Eskom issued a statement in April indicating that seven of its power stations’ coal stockpile levels stood at 20 days, below the required target.

Eskom told Parliament’s portfolio committee on public enterprises that the coal supply issues are made worse by the fact that Tegeta is in business rescue.

It also told Parliament in April that it has plans in place to manage its primary energy resources and achieve healthy stockpiles across its power stations.

“Eskom has already admitted that it is between 3 and 5 million tonnes of coal short. That is more than half of its stockpiles,” said Blom.

“Eskom’s board now consists of a lovely bunch of new guys, but they don’t know anything about the electricity industry. At least half of Eskom’s board should consist of people with knowledge of electricity generation and coal mining.

“Electricity is crucial for South Africa’s economy and diesel has already been used for generation since January at a rate of more than R1bn per month.”

In Blom’s view, South Africa’s energy sector needs a major revamp in which regulation loopholes are closed.

“If Cyril (Ramaphosa) is serious, he should upgrade energy generation regulations and avoid rogue behaviour in the industry,” said Blom.

In his view, energy needs to be declared a basic industrial input factor and every measure taken to keep it as cheap as possible.

“Sensible energy policy is probably the most relevant topic in Africa at this time, and the South African policy is clearly not the one to emulate. We need to start our thinking from the ground up, rather than continue with the patchwork efforts of the past. Without affordable cheap energy, economic growth is not possible,” he cautioned.

Blom will be a speaker at the upcoming African Utility Week taking place in Cape Town from May 15 to 17, during which over 7 000 decision makers from more than 80 countries will discuss energy and water issues faced on the continent.

Fin24 reported last week that Eskom said it is not bailing out Gupta-linked Optimum Coal Mine, which is in business rescue. This was in response to a report by City Press, claiming the proposed business rescue plan for Optimum would see Eskom pay twice as much for half the coal it can get from the mine.

Eskom has said it is in discussions with the mine’s business rescue practitioners and no agreement has been reached.

Source: fin24

We are open for business despite drought : South Africa Tourism

A moral based decision, valuable for the environment

South Africa has been hit by a severe drought that the authorities recently declared a national disaster. The situation in Cape Town is particularly harsh. But South Africa Tourism says the government has taken steps to mitigate the impact on residents and tourists alike.

Faced with a severe drought, that has been classified as one in 1,000-year occurrence, tourism related establishments across South Africa and notably Cape Town, in collaboration with the authorities, have put in place a number of preventive initiatives to ensure adequate water supply for residents as well as tourists’ essential daily needs.

“The tourism sector supports approximately 300 000 jobs across the Western Cape and it is vital to preserve these jobs. During peak season (November – January), international tourists only add 1% to the population of the Western Cape. Majority of tourism establishments have rolled out measures to ensure their water usage is controlled, while many have developed plans for alternative supplies,’’ says Kim Emmanuel, Communication Officer at the Southern Africa Tourism Services Association.

The drought has been due to insufficient rainfall which led to a severe drop in the water stored in the dams. The South African Tourism officials say that due to extensive media coverage of the drought, there are several fears amongst the tourists, but which are completely misplaced. Most of the travellers worry about the ‘Day 0’, concretely the date when Cape Town’s taps are expected to run dry. Currently, Cape Town is fed by six dams catering to its 4 million inhabitants.

Among the steps taken by the hotels and civic authorities in Cape Town is the advice to limit shower time and not use bath. But the decision is moral based and is valuable for the environment, Hanneli Slabber, Regional General Manager, Asia/Australasia/Middle East, South African Tourism, told India Outbound at a recent event in New Delhi. “South Africa and Cape Town are open for business. Tourism activities are happening. There are certain things we need to be competitive on, and there are certain things that are a moral duty. And even if it rains buckets, we are still going to tell people to be more responsible when it comes to usage of water !’’ she added.

“The need of the moment”

In the past few years, South Africa has emerged as the preferred destination for Indian tourists in Africa. Indian leisure visitors numbers to South Africa surged 21.7% last year to close at an arrivals total of 95 377 and 42% of the total tourist arrival from India is return.

“While our guests have expressed concern regarding the water situation in Cape Town, they do understand that water is a very precious resource and must be used with thought and care. Since water scarcity is a global issue the situation in Cape Town brings it to the forefront and hopefully, encourages people to be more aware and governments to be proactive in taking corrective measures,’’ added Smita Srivastava, Director of Chalo South Africa, a TO based in Delhi, adding that the drought has had practically no impact on the tourism traffic from India to South Africa.

South Africa is not an isolated case in terms of facing water scarcity. California, Australia and Sao Paulo have faced similar issues.  “We are learning from them. As citizens of planet earth, this is the need of the moment,’’ added Slabber.

Perhaps very appropriately, Cape Town is hosting, in May this year, the world’s largest water loss conference where 500 participants, from more than 50 countries are expected. Innovation and good practices should come out from the global meeting. By then, the locals hope that the rain gods would have showered their blessings on the city as it heads into the winter.

Source: mediaindia

Unpacking trends with the world’s leading forecaster, Li Edelkoort

Back for Design Indaba Festival 2018 in Johannesburg and Cape Town, trend guru Li Edelkoort’s annual forecast seminar will reveal three critical future trends that will affect business and culture 

Design Indaba 2018 once again sees internationally celebrated trend guru Li Edelkoort sharing her invaluable insights. Held as a stand-alone seminar, Edelkoort’s trend forecast presentation has become one of the most anticipated items on the annual Design Indaba Festival offering.

This year’s seminar will be held in both Johannesburg and Cape Town, and is set to take place at the LISOF: Fashion Design School & Retail Education Institute on 19 February 2018 and Artscape Theatre Centre on Saturday 24 February 2018 respectively. Attendees from across the country will get the opportunity to hear from the internationally renowned Dutch trend forecaster and discover how trends – from fashion, style, colour palettes and fabrics to design concepts and more – are emerging in a world in transition.

In keeping with the Design Indaba’s aim of making a positive impact on society by building a movement that attracts producers of meaningful culture and business, Edelkoort’s seminar unpacks themes that find inspiration in the natural world; from finding spiritual expression in domestic design to the exploring the manifestation of the goddess in fashion trends.Three main themes that span three spheres of design will be explored.

Firstly, Edelkoort will highlight how trends for home and lifestyle design will focus on the spiritual; in response to a world in transition, the home environment becomes a sanctuary, an escape, a refuge and a comfort. “A profound search for simplicity, tenderness and humanity will pervade the spiritual home in which our relationship to furniture, objects, materials and colours will gently shift…” says Edelkoort.

As an extension of lifestyle from the home into the world, activewear for spring/summer 2019 features prominently. “A sudden shift in the wind will mark a change in colour, welcoming a family of beiges as the backbone of the summer season, with bright accents that are taken directly from nature.” says Edelkoort. This will be seen most directly in footwear through the merging of garments and accessories that play between the urban and the outdoor.

Finally, Edelkoort will explore the role of the goddess movement in a turnaround in fashion. “The days of normcore and streetwise basics seem to evaporate in the face of a revolution in shape and making,” says Edelkoort. The most important part, Edelkoort says, is to find your own goddess and express inner divinity through majestic fabrics and regal colours.

By exploring how human needs and desires translate into designed environments and interactive expression through fashion, Li Edelkoort’s seminar is sure to expose, uplift and inspire – as always!

In Johannesburg, the seminar starts at 08h30 and has three sessions and a short break, finishing at 12h30. In Cape Town, the seminar will take place at the Theatre venue at the Artscape. The talk starts at 09h00, with three sessions and a short break, finishing at 13h00.

Tickets for both seminars are available from webtickets, and cost R715 per person. It is essential to book in advance, particularly as the Li Edelkoort sessions are sell-out events. To book, click here: http://www.webtickets.co.za/EventCategory.aspx?itemid=1477136802

Tickets are R 715 per person and can be purchased through Webtickets.

For updates on the Design Indaba Festival of Creativity 2018, Li Edelkoort’s seminar and for ticketing information please visit www.designindaba.com/festival.

Facebook – @designindaba

Twitter – @designindaba

Instagram – @designindaba

Image Credits Below:

TRENDS & TEXTILES – the credit is : artefact from the Metropolitan Museum of art, 4500-4000 bc, bequest of Walter C. Baker, 1971
ACTIVEWEAR – the credit for “the elephant” is : photo by san diego zoo
Daniel Costa (spiritual house)

 

Over 60 or more unique, stunningly designed and painted, life-sized sculptures of Rhinos will be prominently exhibited throughout the city streets, tourism hubs and the Winelands. 

A beautiful Rhino sculpture painted by our local artists is offered to your company in exchange for sponsorship. Your Rhino will have a plaque on its base displaying your brand’s name, logo and mission statement. Your brand’s logo will also be featured on our website, social media platforms and various marketing materials. Some of our Sponsors include: The One & Only Hotel, Belmond Mount Nelson Hotel, The Radisson Blu Hotel Group, Motswari Private Game Reserve and Pick ‘n Pay. They are already using their Rhinos on their own social media platforms and for their PR and marketing campaigns in the run up to the Exhibition.

The City of Cape Town is delighted to partner with us on this initiative by enabling Art Rhinos to be exhibited at numerous most-visited iconic tourism sites. This fabulous summer Outdoor Art Exhibition will benefit Cape Town and environs on many different levels. For example, there will also be a special programme working with schools to uplift children living in poverty through art, and other events where your brand will shine.

Our initiative will raise significant funds for projects focused on rhino conservation. This is a fresh, new and less serious fundraising approach to the most serious business of saving our precious rhinos.  Proceeds from the auction of the Rhinos after the Exhibition will go to StopRhinoPoaching.com, or an approved Rhino Conservation organisation that you support.

Click on the links below for sponsorship costs and benefits:

Sponsorship Costs & Benefits – Presenting Patron All Levels

Sponsorship Costs & Benefits – Level One

Sponsorship Costs & Benefits – Level Two

Water crisis will have a significant impact on Cape wine industry

As the drought now afflicting most of the agricultural and many of the urban sites of the Western and Eastern Cape cuts ever deeper into the fabric of communities, all non-essential consumption is being assessed to determine its relative priority status.

Those who still enjoy access to any water and whose need is commercial – rather than for the sustenance of human life – are already finding themselves in some kind of a competitive pitch, either in the court of public opinion or for priority once the water tenders come trundling in.

In this, the wine industry finds itself in a better position than Cape Town’s restaurants, hairdressers and hotels – if only because, for the time being at least, it’s not facing a certain Day Zero. When the taps go dry in the Mother City, the vines won’t die (at least, not overnight) and there will be years worth of maturing stock to sustain wine producers (as opposed to grape growers) till the rains come, as one day they will.

Where the growers will face some mid- to long-term concerns will be when it comes to prioritising grape farming in the overall context of agriculture. The wine industry may be a major contributor to the economy of the Western Cape, but it is politically alienated. It’s going to have a tough time arguing for its water rights in the face of the demands of other consumers, whether those who seek potable water, those providing more essential foodstuffs, those who can produce evidence that litre for litre (to parody the late Clive Weil’s “trolley for trolley”) they generate more revenue, more employment, or a better fiscal contribution than other competitors for this resource.

Some regions and districts are better off than others: Elgin, around an hour’s drive from Cape Town, catches more precipitation than many of the coastal appellations and has adequate water supplies for fruit growing and wine-making – for the moment. On the other hand, this year the high-volume, irrigation-dependent growers along the banks of the Olifant’s River could see well over 50% of their potential crop lost – simply because their operations have been designed around optimising crop size (rather than quality) by massively hydrating their vines.

The Clanwilliam dam level is so low that grape growers will be allocated a mere 17% of their normal uptake. While for such large-scale farming operations the drought spells bad news, their crisis will have a relatively small impact on consumers of fine wines. The price of cask wine would go up, as would the price of those beverages which depend on this low-cost grape-based alcohol. The fruit juice industry would also have to look elsewhere for the concentrate with which they create their particular brand of sugary drink.

Vines, as viticulturists constantly remind us, are weeds. They may not thrive on neglect, but unlike roses, for example, they are hardy andrelatively drought-resistant. (In France it is illegal to irrigate vineyards producing appellation contrôlée wines). Vines will not necessarily produce their best fruit under arid conditions, but they will survive, and in some circumstances they might do very well. The best two Coastal Region vintage years in recent memory in South Africa were 2015 and 2017, while 2016 produced some very good wines. This trio of vintages (particularly the latter two) sit firmly in the era of constrained water supply. The 2018 crop will certainly be smaller – even in the areas which are not as dependent on irrigation as the Olifants River – but the smaller berry size could lead to more concentrated flavours. The concerns for now are the potential for excessive vine stress during the ripening season, as well as heat spikes going into the key weeks leading up to the vintage. The next month or two will provide empirical results.

The much more serious effect of the water shortage could be in its impact on wine producers – in other words, those who convert the fruit into wine. Wineries are food factories and consume an enormous amount of water. Many were built in an era when water conservation wasn’t front of mind. In the past couple of decades planning permission has been linked to waste water management, but even here this has generally meant containing the chemicals and waste removed in cleaning and flushing the tanks, barrels and winery buildings. In a situation which is not unlike the one presently confronting hairdressers and restaurateurs, winery owners may have to find a way of performing the processes which define their economic activity without the supplies of water that they have, until now, taken for granted. Recycling what they are able to obtain would certainly be a key component of whatever strategy they devise – but they would have to be more willing (than the Western Cape authorities, for example) to work on the assumption that water shortages are here to stay – at least for the foreseeable future.

Small-scale water recycling plants – of the kind which enable rural real estate developers to provide proper water-borne sewerage management (rather than the more old-fashioned septic tank treatments) cost around R900,000 and turn waste into potable water. This is not an investment lightly undertaken if you believe that by the 2019 vintage the dams will be full. However, if you need to plan the continued existence of a business whose real window of opportunity is a three-month period between the time the grapes come into your cellar, and the fermentation has been complete, you can’t disregard the importance of making the investment: it’s no different from installing generators, inverters and UPS back-ups in a time of load shedding.

The 2018 water crisis is going to have a significant impact on the Cape wine industry. Its primary impact – looking at the whole value chain from vineyards to the distribution of finished wine – will initially be a marginal decline in fine wine availability, a more significant decline (with a commensurate increase in price) in the vin ordinaire sector, with higher average costs per litre produced. These initial shortages may help the industry achieve its objective of a structural re-pricing exercise (though I wouldn’t hold my breath). The bigger question of whether the production sector will be able to adjust to an environment in which supplies of water are semi-permanently constrained will depend on the availability of financial resources, as well as the willingness to invest.

There is a final consideration, seemingly unimportant in the face of more pressing needs, which does need to factored into the industry’s long-term planning: its lobbyists constantly remind government that wine is a key driver of international tourism, which in turn makes an important contribution to the GDP of the Western Cape. If there are fewer tourists because of the long-term effects of the drought, less wine will be sold. Likewise, if the wine industry declines, so might the number of tourists. There will of course be a new equilibrium – but it will come with less employment and more hardship, spread through a population whose prospects are already looking pretty grim.

Source: dailymaverick

Green Planet Laundry: Cheaper than washing at home and even your local laundromat!

The average washing machine uses 50 litres of water per load. While Capetonians are allowed only 87 litres of water per person per day, washing one’s clothing at home is almost impossible. Save money – and the environment – with Green Planet Laundry.

Experts predict that the Western Cape drought will continue to have a big impact on citizens for years to come, and that even once it passes, we will need to do more to limit our daily water consumption. Green Planet Laundry’s innovative process, which uses purified borehole water instead of drinking water to clean your laundry, is a major step in the right direction. But, whenever consumers hear the words “green,” “eco-conscious” or “eco-friendly,” they think expensive. The great news is that Green Planet Laundry offers competitive pricing, and in many cases, they’recheaper than your local laundromat!

For washing and folding, the average laundromat in Cape Town charges between R25 and R40 per kilogram of laundry, and between R34 and R45 to have the washed laundry ironed as well. Green Planet comes in under with the average with this impressive price list:

Wash & Fold (5kg minimum) R28 per kg
Wash, Iron & Fold (5kg minimum) R40 per kg
Blankets & Duvet Inners From R89 per item
Curtains (including ironing) R75 per kg
Shoes (fabric) R60 per pair
Stain treatment R15 per item

See the full price list here: https://greenplanetlaundry.com/price-list/

Why is it so affordable? Municipal (drinking) water is expensive, and the average laundromat uses thousands of litres of it every day. Green Planet Laundry uses sophisticated equipment to extract and purify underground borehole water, which eliminates water bills while preserving our precious water supply. This allows Green Planet Laundry to keep costs down, and make this revolutionary system more affordable for the public.

Green Planet Laundry will open its doors in Cape Town on 16 October 2017.

About Green Planet Laundry

Unlike other Commercial Laundries, the Cape Town based Green Planet Laundry does not tap into the city’s precious municipal water supply. Instead, they make use of purified borehole water. That means that absolutely no tap water is used!

How does it work?

The Water used at Green Planet Laundry is 100% ground water (borehole).  Additionally, 50% of the (grey) water used in our machines is recycled therefore further reducing required ground water.

Cape Town residents can now experience the convenience of sending their laundry to be cleaned without the guilt of wasting natural resources. Water restrictions in the Western Cape are becoming a permanent fixture, and this is a perfect opportunity through which residents can decrease the number of litres consumed by their household.

 

Green Planet Laundry services all the greater Cape Town areas from Strand to Paarl to Duynefontein to Cape Point.

For more information, please mail Anien at anien@thelittleblackbook.co.za.

Hospitality Marketing Maven Joins Premier Hotels & Resorts

With over 25 years of marketing, public relations and events management experience – predominantly within the hospitality industry – Christa Badenhorst has been appointed by Premier Hotels & Resorts as the Group’s new Marketing Manager.

The hospitality chain’s Founder and Managing Director, Samuel Nassimov, says: “Christa is a seasoned marketing professional and is well-placed to assist us in achieving our vision of becoming the preferred destination of choice among the discerning business and leisure market. She brings local and international experience, passion, energy and a can-do attitude to the table.”

Badenhorst began her post-graduate career at the South African Broadcasting Company (SABC), during which time she obtained a diploma in Public Relations and went on to become the Publicity Officer for the National Symphony Orchestra.  Later, she joined Amalgamated Beverage Industries’ Fountain Division as a Public Relations Officer, where she managed the account for the best-selling and most popular brand in the world, Coca-Cola.

In 1997, Badenhorst was appointed as the Marketing and PR Manager of a leading Muldersdrift wedding venue. She then made the move to Cape Town when an opportunity arose at a hospitality group that would enable her to enhance her experience of the industry. As their Operations and Guest Relations Manager, she gained deeper insight into the field, which has stood her in good stead in subsequent roles.

In 2001, she was given the opportunity of a lifetime to work in Dubai where, as a Senior Account Manager, her main client was a large global hotel chain that at that stage had 122 properties in the Middle East and North Africa. After almost three years in the United Arab Emirates, Badenhorst’s longing for family and fresh air brought her back home and she began working as a PR Manager at a small Melville-based firm.

Following the emigration of her employer and consequent closure of the business, she joined an award-winning upmarket Pretoria country estate as its Marketing Manager. She was later approached by the director of a hotel and spa group to establish a group identity – a challenge she welcomed. Highlights of her ten years with the company include establishing an in-house PR, media and social media department as well as the opening and rebranding of several hotels, Spas and restaurants bringing the total property count to nine units.

Over the course of her career Badenhorst has constantly upskilled herself in order to adapt to the ever-changing marketing landscape, adding numerous qualifications to her name.

On her appointment, Badenhorst shares: “I am so excited about having the opportunity to work alongside a visionary like Mr Nassimov, who has built this empire from nothing to 16 outstanding properties. Premier Hotel Cape Town has just completed an R11 million renovation, Premier Resort Sani Pass has undergone a R75 million overhaul and both Premier Hotel Cape Town and Premier Resort The Moorings in Knysna have introduced kosher facilities. Now, we are about to embark on upgrades to a new property in Bloemfontein. With so many renovations and launches lined up, we are heading for an exciting year and I am so proud to be part of this process.”

“We are thrilled to have Christa joining our company and look forward to seeing her immense experience and expertise in action,” concludes Nassimov.

For more information, visit https://www.premierhotels.co.za.

Source: Premier Hotel

Record numbers of volunteers participate in 2017 international coastal clean-up day

This past weekend saw the 21st year in which South Africa participated in the International Coastal Clean-Up (ICC) – an annual event that has become the biggest, global volunteer effort for ocean health.

Despite inclement weather experienced in Cape Town on the day,  2017 would be remembered for having one of the best turn-outs of volunteers who freely offered up their time to participate in picking up litter from our beaches.

“We will only have the official stats of the amount and type of litter collected later this year once all the audit sheets have been compiled and analysed, but we can definitely say that we saw an increase in the number of community groups, schools and businesses who participated in this year’s ICC,” said Douw Steyn, Sustainability Director: Plastics|SA.
Although extensive education and communication campaigns have been taking place over the past few years, volunteers agreed that they were shocked to see how much litter is still found on our country’s beaches.
Packaging continues to be a major culprit and items such as straws, sweet wrappers, chips packets, earbuds and cigarette butts were found strewn across our coastlines.
“Approximately 75% of ocean litter is derived from land based waste. Without effective waste collection, an avalanche of debris enters the ocean. Even a packet that is carelessly thrown out of a car window thousands of kilometres inland, could eventually find its way to the ocean.
We need to address the importance of an effective waste management system upstream and increase our efforts to educate the public about the importance of recycling. Plastics is not the problem. People not discarding their used plastics products properly or ensuring it gets recycled, is the issue that needs to be addressed,” Steyn advocated.
“Effective methods for separation-at-source and the collection of recyclable materials are vital if we are to find a long-term and workable solution. To this end, we invite industry bodies, government and communities to work together with us as we count down to the World Clean-Up Day that will take place next year on the 15th of Septemberas part of the global “Let’s Do It” Campaign*.
This worldwide wave of clean-ups will start in New Zealand and follow the sunthrough 24 time zones, ending 36 hours later in Hawaii. Volunteers from more than 150 countries will join the world’s biggest positive civic collaboration in the fight against illegal waste.
“Our sincere thanks everyone who was involved in this year’s activities and helped to make a difference in their environment. Without the support of our many sponsors and the help of every volunteer, we would not have been able to collect the large amount of litter that we did on Saturday.
We are busy writing a success story that shows what can be accomplished through teamwork and a commitment to save the environment for future generations,” Steyn concluded.
Source: Plastics SA