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Organic Pig Production Reduces Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

A recent study published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Microbiology has found that pigs raised on organic farms have significantly fewer strains of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter bacteria than pigs raised on conventional farms. Campylobacter is a bacteria known to jump from livestock, particularly from poultry and pigs, to infect humans. Researchers took fecal or colon samples from organic and conventional pigs in France and Sweden and tested them for Campylobacter bacteria as well as antibiotic-resistant strains. Pigs were tested from 50 farms in France and 54 farms in Sweden. Unsurprisingly, they found that there was no difference in the amount of Campylobacter bacteria from organic or conventional farms. Naturally associated with pigs, Campylobacter was expected to be found on all farms. However, the study results did show that organic samples from France had significantly fewer antibiotic-resistant strains than samples from conventional farms. Meanwhile, pigs raised in Sweden exhibited no difference in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter. This result may have been because different species of Campylobacter bacteria are found in Sweden and France, and biological variation among these species may equate to differences in how antibiotic resistance develops and persists in the bacteria.

Source: organic-center

Making gas out of Africa’s waste

What we may see as waste, others see as a resource.

Clean Energy Africa is one such company producing gas and fuels out of trash.
One of its plants in Cape Town, worth $30 million, aims to consume 560 tons of solid waste per day. This is about seven percent of the total waste the six million residents of Cape Town produce daily.
“We are trying to be a landfill alternative which means we take waste from various sources, bring the waste in, clean it up, produce gas, produce fuels,” Egmont Ottermann, Clean Energy Africa’s CEO, told CNN.
Companies such as waste removal company Wastemart already pays to deliver its waste to the plant.
“We see the plant in Cape Town as a springboard for developing more plants in the future,” added Ottermann.
“It’s where we have to get things right, it’s our blueprint, it’s the first one where we get the formula for building and operating it right.”

How it works

The waste used for fuel has to be organic matter. It is piped into huge vats, where bacteria converts it to natural gas. The biogas generated is then cleaned and piped to the market, either as methane rich gas or liquid CO2 rich gas.
“The Cape Town market is looking for alternatives to its current energy sources, so alternatives to heavy fuels, coal, LPG, diesel; and it fits beautifully in that,” said Silvia Schollenberger from AFROX, one of the main gas suppliers in Cape Town and a Clean Energy Africa shareholder.
There are plans for similar projects in at least three other cities in South Africa, and eventually across Africa.
Source: edition.cnn

South Africa: Water and Sanitation Cleans Water Tanks in Senekal

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is embarking on an operation to test water in Senekal on 12 to 15 April 2016. Water tankers that supply the community with water, sponsored by the department, will be tested for any hazardous substance or bacteria.

DWS has enlisted the assistance of the University of the Free State (UFS) to test and clean the tanks used to supply water to communities of Senekal. Taking into consideration the health of the community and prioritizing it, DWS will test water from the source where the water tankers are filled and the tankers themselves as well as the nozzles to ensure quality of water is safe for consumption.

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Where necessary chemicals such as Sodium Hypochlorite are added to the water in the tank and circulated for a period of thirty minutes before the water can be distributed to consumers. These processes are followed routinely to avoid any outbreaks off illness from consumption of unclean water.

 The department is also appealing to communities to clean the containers they use to collect water from the truck with a cleaning agent momentarily to ensure they drink clean water at all times.

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Source: allafrica


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These plastic-eating bacteria could help cut down on waste

Recycling is so 20th century. According to one new study, there could be a new way to cut down on plastic waste: bacteria that consume one of the major components of our old bottles and clothes.

The study, published Thursday in Science, focuses on a newly-discovered bacterium called Ideonella sakaiensis. It was found outside of a bottle recycling plant, and it seems to have evolved a pair of enzymes it uses to break down polyethylene terephthalate or PET, a polymer so widely used to make plastic that about 50 million tons of it are made every year.

Because 311 million tons of plastics are produced worldwide each year — and very little of that amount makes it to recycling plants — scientists are always on the lookout for new, better ways of making PET break down when it inevitably ends up in landfills, but it’s tough stuff.

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“You may think this is the rerun of an old story, as plastic-eating microbes have already been touted as saviors of the planet,” the University of Hull’s Mark Lorch, who wasn’t involved in the study, wrote for The Conversation. “But there are several important differences here. First, previous reports were of tricky-to-cultivate fungi, where in this case the microbe is easily grown. The researchers more or less left the PET in a warm jar with the bacterial culture and some other nutrients, and a few weeks later all the plastic was gone.”

The impressive results don’t mean that we can start tossing plastic bottles into landfills all willy-nilly: It’s going to take some more work before the bacteria are ready to tackle our messes. For now, they still have a hard time breaking down the highly crystallized form of PET used in most hard plastics.

“It’s difficult to break down highly crystallized PET,” study author Kenji Miyamoto of Keio University told The Guardian. “Our research results are just the initiation for the application. We have to work on so many issues needed for various applications. It takes a long time.”

And there are other potential hiccups: If plastics were broken down using bacterial processes, they might release unsavory molecules and compounds into the environment that would otherwise stay locked up.

But even if there’s no direct use for Ideonella sakaiensis in our environment, the bacteria’s mechanism for consuming PET could be used to develop synthetic plastic-chompers in the lab. And the bacteria’s existence is a great sign: PET has only been around for about 70 years, and this indicates that at least one organism has already evolved the ability to consume it. It’s likely that there are other microbes out there doing the same thing for PET and other kinds of plastics — and one of those species could wind up revolutionizing the way we recycle.

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Source: washingtonpost


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