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WHAT IS THE AFRICAN REAL ESTATE & INFRASTRUCTURE SUMMIT?

Join us for the third edition of the award winning African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit which showcases a collection of Africa’s top real estate and infrastructure projects. This exclusive, high-level two day exhibition and interactive conference is attended by over 300 property professionals, developers, investors, city and municipal planners and offers a platform to explore the future of urban development in African cities.

We will explore key themes and topics shaping Africa’s urban growth and development along 2 tracks:

Track 1: Residential Development Summit

Track 2: Commercial, Industrial and Infrastructure Summit

AFRICAN REAL ESTATE & INFRASTRUCTURE SUMMIT EVENT TRACKS

TRACK 1: RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT SUMMIT

Explore and unpack the residential development market with industry thought leaders, keynote presentations and panel discussions around:

  • Housing under the microscope: Exploring regional supply and demand of various asset classes.
  • What land is available for residential development?
  • Exploring the increasing trend of developers holding onto stock, and REITs adding residential to their portfolio.
  • Industry experts unravel how to maximise the value of your residential development.
  • Can mixed-use developments be considered the future of residential development?
  • The affordable housing conundrum: How do we make affordable housing more attractive to investors?
  • Future Focus: Are millennials changing the status quo for property development?

TRACK 2: COMMERCIAL & INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT SUMMIT

Engage with industry thought leaders presenting on both the commercial and industrial landscape tied in with infrastructure development

  • What exciting opportunities lie in our Industrial Development Zones?
  • Examining master planning and public/private collaborations within the commercial property sector.
  • Integrated Urban Development: Investigating successful mixed use development projects with case studies.
  • How do we successfully interlink transport systems to urban developments?
  • Questioning how our African cities are embracing smart technology to become more efficient.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE

Exhibition stands

Take advantage of our unique exhibition stands to showcase products, services and solutions to the audience

Contact us to secure a space on floor.

• Early bird booking R 7, 500 pp (Valid until 29 June 2018)
• Standard booking R 8, 500 pp (Valid until 31 August 2018)
• Late /onsite bookings R 10, 000 pp (Valid until 11 October 2018)

INCLUDES:

• Full access to the 2-day conference programme
• Lunch for both days
• Networking function
• Access to business-to-business matchmaking prior to the event

Sponsorship items

Please enquire about our sponsorship opportunities, these include:

  • Headline sponsor
  • Gold sponsor
  • Silver sponsor
  • Networking sponsor
  • Sessions sponsorships
  • Lunch sponsorship
  • Bag sponsorship
  • Lanyard sponsor

CONTACT US TO SECURE YOUR ATTENDANCE

Richard Stubbs – Portfolio Director
e: richard.stubbs@spintelligent.com
t: +27 21 700 3582

Benjamin Jones Event Manager – Property Buyer Show
e: benjamin.jones@spintelligent.com
t: +27 21 700 3595

Catherine Brassell – Event Manager
e: catherine.brassell@spintelligent.com
t: +27 21 700 3580

Juante Massing – Marketing
e: juante.massing@spintelligent.com
t: +27 21 700 3596

http://www.african-real-estate-summit.com/

 

Five ways we can make African cities smarter

My family and I were recently stuck in moderate traffic in Sandton, Johannesburg, which led to a discussion between me and my kids about how traffic, and the way we deal with it as drivers, will look very different in future.

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At a minimum, my kids will fully embrace the use of connected Uber-like car-share services to get around – or even more exciting, will use driverless vehicles. The potential impact of this on cities will be tremendous, not only in terms of time and efficiency, but also from the point of view of safety and our carbon footprint.

A report by US consulting firm McKinsey & Company analysed the impact of driverless cars on the incidence of fatal traffic accidents. They claim that deaths on the road in the US will reduce by up to 90% by mid-century. This is just one of the ways that our cities could feel the benefit of smart solutions. Intelligent transport combined with safety, security and utilities management – to mention but a few – will change the face of cities fundamentally for the next generation.

According to reports by the United Nations, in the next 40 years we will see 70% of the world’s population living in cities, and water scarcity for around 1.8 billion people (predominantly in developing countries) as a result of climate change.

This chart from the UN shows how fast African cities, in particular, are expected to grow between now and 2050.

jedjling__1_-_source_united_nations

To address these challenges, an efficient and competitive city will rely on purpose-driven industrial transformations to remain sustainable. ICT will be at the centre of this transformation process. For sustainable operations, cities must use ICT in ways that not only meet stakeholders’ initial sustainability requirements, but also enable an ongoing rebalancing of needs, resources and other priorities – such as the right to privacy.

It’s clear that the way in which cities balance economic competitiveness, environmental pressures and social needs will affect the lives of billions of people. But smart, sustainable city transformations are complex and difficult. So how do we ensure that African cities become not only smarter, but more sustainable?

1. A shared vision

There are many opportunities for smart solutions within cities. The challenge is to prioritise these options to three or four key focus areas and to then successfully deliver on them. Stakeholders need shared goals and a clear idea of how to achieve them.

2. Holistic governance

Leadership structures must be capable of retaining the holistic, macro view of the city’s needs, and enable all projects to follow the common vision, integrating both ICT and environmental priorities. In this way, common platforms, data formats and monitoring systems are ensured, which will enable the sharing of information for mutual benefit between departments – something that was impossible previously.

3. The mayor and the ecosystem

Cities are made up of a complex ecosystem of stakeholders. The key is to ensure governance structures, stakeholder groups, city departments, local government, public and private enterprises work together to drive the common smart-city agenda. In this, the mayor should take a leading role.

4. ICT development

The technology landscape is evolving rapidly, so it is important to develop a continuous ICT learning culture among the city’s transformation drivers, sharing new developments and exploring emerging possibilities and approaches. Bodies such as the Smart Africa Alliance create platforms to share best practices.

5. Long-term partnerships

Broad engagement is vital when identifying and ranking the city’s pain points and stakeholders’ concerns. The smart, sustainable city value chain comprises several interconnected ICT layers: infrastructure, enablers, devices and applications. Within each of these layers, various stakeholders are involved. For example, consultation with appropriate stakeholders at the infrastructure and enabling layers can build awareness of the long-term business-case advantages for shared, standards-based infrastructure (as opposed to closed, vertical deployments). Therefore, the various stakeholders are a source of ideas and solutions that can help shape the overall vision.

Most African countries have commendable objectives of promoting technology development and creating ICT infrastructure, capability and skills to connect the unconnected and usher in the era of the internet of things. Their focus is on creating sustainable and smart cities, countries – and ultimately, continent.

This is aligned to Goal 11 of the UN Sustainable Development Goals, which specifically relates to sustainable cities and communities. As drivers of change, cities now have more and better technological tools at their disposal than ever before. Becoming smart and sustainable is not a one-off achievement, but rather a continuous journey requiring ongoing engagement, innovation and progress.

To ensure the best chance of success, those shaping the future of sustainable smart cities must lay a solid foundation for transformation, based on purpose-driven planning, networked governance structures, organizational capacity building, broad stakeholder engagement and effective long-term partnerships.

This will make the journey, with or without an actual driver, an interesting one.

Learn more and network with the best

Earn valuable CPD credits

Redeem your 50% discount

How to use product life cycle analysis to your advantage. (David Baggs)

Source: cnbcafrica


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AFRICITIES: Local governments in Africa going green, and putting their money where their mouths are

AFRICAN cities have begun taking the lead with investments in and the implementation of interventions that are designed to conserve natural resources and energy for generations to come.

This is as many countries around the world look to innovative ways to conserve and efficiently manage critical resources – particularly the supply of safe and clean water and energy.

Johannesburg in South Africa, for example, has set aside R234 million (approximately $20 million) from its operating budget to be spent on environment and infrastructure services during the current financial year.

Areas that the city is investing in include; biodiversity conservation, integrated waste management and ecological infrastructure. The rehabilitation of a mine dump, air quality improvement, as well as climate change and energy diversification, are just some of a number of green initiatives that the metropolitan is focused on.

Johannesburg executive mayor, Parks Tau, referred to these interventions as being “just a few that demonstrate how local governments need to be pioneers in this space in order to advance the development of the African continent”.

“The demand for efficient, reliable and affordable renewable and environmentally friendly energy is a basic need for all African households and industries. Local governments need to harness all available energy resources and come up with fresh approaches and initiatives to fund new projects, and encourage investments in this space through green incentives,” Tau said.

He further said: “Cities are the building blocks in optimising resources for the development of Africa in the lead up to 2063, and it is safe to say that African cities are awake to this reality. In-line with the vision of Agenda 2063, the continent needs to intensify its mobilisation of  resources to finance its development and environmental sustainability.”

Last year, the City of Johannesburg became the first municipality in South Africa to list a “Green Bond” at the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE). The money raised through the R1.46 billion bond, that will mature in 2024, is set to finance green initiatives such as the Bio Gas-Energy Project, and other initiatives aimed at reducing green-house gas emissions.

This innovative approach to mobilising funds for sustainable development projects will also ensure that essential environmental infrastructure and services are financed without a significant impact on the city’s purse.

Another African city which is implementing several sustainability focused projects and on the lead to promote efficient community-based waste management is Lagos in Nigeria.

The capital city’s rapid urbanisation and population growth has put a lot of pressure on its water, waste management and sanitation infrastructure. These have seen the birth of the Lagos State Water Supply Master Plan 2010 – 2020, which promotes, among others, access to potable water, reduction of waste and unaccounted water.

The plan is also designed to increase the amount of billed water, revenue collection efficiency and enhance reinvestment.

Lagos’ Sustainable Sewage and Sanitation Strategy furthermore includes the development of 10 new wastewater treatment plants. This is also as the city has a landfill gas project underway, which comprises a municipal solid waste composting facility earmarked to lead to a significant reduction of emissions.

Another African city with an exemplary environmental management, monitoring and participation strategy is Accra – the capital City of Ghana. According to the Siemens Green City Report, Accra is also strong in air quality and sanitation areas, and ranks above average for its high rate of renewable electricity and low electricity consumption.

The upcoming 7th Africities Summit, which is organised by the United Cities and Local Governments of Africa, is expected to touch on efficient resource management and renewable energy initiatives across the continent. It will be held in Johannesburg, South Africa from 29 November to 3 December.

Source: mgafrica


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Rubbish can power Africa’s cities

Energy generated from rubbish could power an estimated 40 million households across Africa by 2025, proposes a study.
Using existing data on refuse and urban population growth, the researchers measured the total energy potential of all Africa’s urban solid waste from both incineration and methane produced from landfill sites.

Their study was published last month in the journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews.

“Our analysis shows that waste, and in particular municipal solid waste, is a renewable energy resource that could provide a meaningful share of both gross energy consumption and electricity on the African continent,” says study author Fabio Monforti-Ferrario, from the European Commission’s in-house science service the Joint Research Centre.

The study reveals that Africa’s urban rubbish could have generated 62.5 terawatt-hours (TWh) of electricity in 2012 if it had been used in waste-powered plants, for example those at incinerate rubbish or use methane from decaying waste matter to generate electricity. This could increase to 122.2 TWh in 2025 as such plants become more efficient and widespread, the paper says. By comparison, Africa’s overall energy consumption in 2010 was 661.5 TWh.

But the researchers found a vast difference in waste production and management from country to country. Some data points to a drop in the production of suitable waste over the coming decade (see chart). Yet even if this happens, municipal waste could still produce energy for 27 million families in 2025, based on the average African electricity consumption in 2010, the researchers say.

The World Bank predicts Africa’s population will expand to 2.8 billion people by 2060. This growth will bring greater demands on already struggling waste management systems, according to Mark Borchers, technical director at not-for-profit company Sustainable Energy Africa.

“Waste in African cities is often not effectively collected and, when it is, the landfill sites are often not managed in a way that will enable technologies, such as methane capture for energy purposes,” he says.

Financing is also a concern. Bettina Kamuk, chairwoman of the International Solid Waste Association’s working group on energy recovery, says it can be hard to find the money to build electricity plants that burn waste. “In the short term, treatment of waste by incineration is more expensive than landfilling or dumping,” she says.
Logan Moodley, manager of the Engineering, Cleansing and Solid Waste Unit of Durban,  South Africa, adds that political support for renewable technologies is lacking.

“There is a need for legislation and incentives to support development,” he says. “For waste-to-energy to be a feasible way forward, political buy-in is needed on all levels.”

Source: scidev


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African cities to address the sustainability question

Chairperson of the African Union Commission, Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma will address Agenda 2063 at the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, which forms part of Sustainability Week, taking place from Tuesday, 23 to Thursday, 25 June at the CSIR International Conference Centre.

Africa’s forecasted growth is undeniable. The United Nations’ report on urbanisation found that continuing population growth and urbanisation are projected to add 2.5 billion people to the world’s urban population by 2050, with nearly 90% of the increase concentrated in Asia and Africa. How to prepare a sustainable future for Africa that improves the quality of life for civilians while drastically reducing the environmental footprint will be the topic of discussion at the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, hosted by the City of Tshwane.

Dr Dlamini-Zuma will join mayors from the African capital cities of Abuja, Mbabane, Harare, São Tomè, Dodoma, Kinshasa, Banjul and Abuja, amongst others, as they seek to find sustainable solutions to the sustainability imperative. This significant pan African dialogue will lay the foundation for expanded African cooperation at the city level, and at the urban scale.

Mayor of the City of Tshwane, Honourable Cllr Kgosientso Ramokgopa will provide a local perspective on the sustainability needs and solutions facing South African Cities as well as the vertical integration of sustainability principles.

With a wealth of experience in urban and economic development, local governance and housing, Jean Pierre Elong Mbassi, Secretary General of United Cities and Local Governments of Africa will address enhanced cooperation among African cities at the Forum. Mbassi is the man behind the Africities Summit and is the Deputy Secretary General of the China-Africa forum of local governments and current Chairperson of the Cities Alliance Interim Management Board.

Professor of Sustainability at Curtin University in Australia, Peter Newman, who has written on Green Urbanism and how to overcome automobile dependence will share from his experience having worked with local and national government in the area of sustainability. Other riveting speakers include Tlou Ramaru, Senior Policy Advisor: International Sustainable Development and Trade Cooperation at the Department of Environmental Affairs; Seana Nkahle, Chairman of the Green Building Council of South Africa (GBCSA); Prof. David Everatt, Executive Director, Gauteng City Region Observatory; and Erky Wood: Director at GAPP Architects And Urban Designers.

The Forum will end off with a mayors’ round table discussion on finding consensus on the opportunity for capital cities to take a leadership position in relation to sustainability.

The African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum will look at how appropriate policies, design ingenuity, innovation, technical proficiency and infrastructural investments can ensure a sustainable and prosperous future for the next generation. The Forum forms part of Sustainability Week which brings together a wide variety of stakeholders from a range of sectors to discuss sustainability under specific themes: green building, food security, transport, manufacturing, energy and water amongst many other riveting seminars. An exhibition space will also show case eco-friendly technology, energy and water efficient appliances and other projects that relate to sustainability.

Source: pressportal

 


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Tshwane mayor addresses sustainability in major cities

The executive mayor of the City of Tshwane, Kgosientso Ramokgopa, addressed attendees at the inaugural African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum at Sustainability Week on Tuesday, 23 June 2015.

The forum explored opportunities to address the sustainability imperative arising from the current and numerous challenges facing African cities. Mayors from the African capital cities of Abuja, Mbabane, Harare, São Tomè, Dodoma, Kinshasa, Banjul and Abuja, amongst others, were in attendance and speakers looked at how appropriate policies, design ingenuity, innovation, technical proficiency and infrastructural investments can ensure a sustainable and prosperous future for the next generation.

“According to the United Nations, in 1919 only 40% of the global population lived in cities. Today just over 50% live in cities and it is predicted that by 2050, 70% of the global population will be living in urban centres. A large percentage of this number will converge in capital cities,” said Ramokgopa.
“This forum seeks to establish commonalities and challenges experienced by the major cities in Africa while showcasing and sharing successful initiatives towards the emergence of truly African, original and appropriate answers in addressing the sustainability imperative. This significant pan African dialogue will lay the foundation for expanded African cooperation at the city level, and at the urban scale,” he continued.

Local perspective

Ramokgopa provided a local perspective on the sustainability needs and solutions facing South Africa and discussed the City of Tshwane’s Vision 2055 to become a low carbon, resource efficient and climate resilient city.

The forum forms part of Sustainability Week which brings together a wide variety of stakeholders from a range of sectors to discuss sustainability under specific themes: green building, food security, transport, manufacturing, energy and water etc.

Source: bizcommunity


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“ Climate Change: The Good News ”

‘The world has now worked out how to create wealth with fossil fuels’ says Peter Newman, Professor off Sustainability from Curtin University in Perth, Australia.

‘The evidence is now here that we are decoupling GDP growth from fossil fuels, for the first time in 200 years. Not only in the developed world but also in China, India and South Africa, he said at the first African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum in Tshwane.

‘This is the good news that help world leaders prepare for the Paris talks in December, when the phasing out of fossil fuels is agreed to by all nations’, he said.

‘How is this happening?’ Newman asked.

‘Coal is being phased out because renewables are now a cheaper and more reliable investment for the future, as well as energy efficiency.’

‘Across the world we are seeing the demonstration of zero carbon buildings and neighbourhoods at low cost with hi-Ion batteries now the next revolutionary addition making renewables available 24 hours.’

‘Oil is being phased out by the reduction in ear dependence and the growth of electric transport options’ Professor Newman outlined.

‘Cities in the developed world are reversing their urban sprawl and investing in quality, fast rail systems to overcome traffic problems. Peak car use and enhanced walkable cities are now indicators of wealth,’ he said.

‘But the extraordinary shift to electric transport in China (and now India) is showing how quickly oil can be phased out. The building of electric metros in 86 Chinese cities, the development of 11,000km of fats train systems, linking cities and the growth of 250 million electric vehicles (mostly electric bikes and scooters), is now helping clear the air as well reduce greenhouse emissions.’

Just as India’s cities are poised to take up the mantle of development with sustainable energy and sustainable transport, African cities, are similarly facing this new agenda.’

‘The key message I have’, Professor Newman said, is that African cities should be strong in their goal t lead the world to a more sustainable future. The evidence is now in that you do not need fossil fuels to develop African cities economically and socially.

Press Statement: by Peter Newman, Professor of Sustainability, Lead Author IPCC, Perth, Australia

Four innovative African architects bring a new wow to buildings on the continent

Ever heard of a floating African city? Now you have.

African architecture is as diverse as the different cultures and peoples that make up the continent.

Islam and Christianity have produced astounding churches and magnificent mosques. The mix of colonial and modern influences have clashed in the urban environment, in some cities economic or political turmoil resulted in an eclectic clash of styles and little consideration of aesthetic beauty, and in rural areas the local environment was often the driver in the influence of design and structure.

Recently, however, something different has sprouted on the continent. There is a new breed of architect whose work is suffused with social responsibility, and the designs that emanate from them are nothing short of genius.

Their structures created are carefully crafted to fit in with the various demands or pressures of modern day society in Africa.

Here we take a look at a few examples of these extraordinary architects:

Diébédo Francis Kéré

Even though he’s had international success and is based in Berlin, Germany, this hasn’t stopped Burkinabé architect Kéré from making waves back home, in Burkina Faso. Founded in 2005, Kéré Architecture is dedicated to supporting the educational, cultural, and sustainable needs of communities in Burkina Faso through sustainable building practices. Using his formal training as an architect, Kéré has developed strategies for innovative construction by combining traditional Burkinabé building techniques and materials with modern engineering methods.

His projects in Burkina Faso are impressive. In the village of Gando, his birth place, Kéré made a great push for education by constructing schools, along with the help of the local community, and the necessary teacher housing, library and wells to support them.

Image courtesy of Kerearchitecture.com
Image courtesy of Kerearchitecture.com

Each structure was carefully conceived to support the learning environment and be as adaptable as possible to the areas geography. Mud brick walls combined with raised tin roofs use material which is locally available and keep the buildings cool and dry. The school library has a roof with traditional clay pots that have been cut in half and inserted in the ceiling, letting in light and allowing air to circulate.

In June this year the “Surgical Clinic and Health Centre” was opened, serving a population of over 50,000 people from the town of Léo and its surrounding communities. In planning for the most sustainable building solution with least ecological impact, the main construction of the centre is compressed earth bricks.

Image courtesy of Kerearchitecture.com
Image courtesy of Kerearchitecture.com

Their high thermal mass capacity allows them to absorb the cool night air and release it during the day, helping keep the interior spaces cool. The clinic also features ten large overlapping roofs that protect the walls from rain and shade the interiors from the hot daytime sun. The vibrantly-coloured buildings are sited around a central outdoor corridor – a friendly characteristic which is important for the success of the centre, as it attracts patients who would normally not seek medical attention.

Kunlé Adeyemi

Kunlé Adeyemi is a Nigerian architect and urbanist – heavily influenced by the fast-paced urbanisation of African cities. After studying at the University of Lagos in Nigeria, followed by Princeton in the US, Adeyemi founded NLÉ – an architecture and design practice based in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

One of his recent projects has focused on his homeland and its fast urbanisation rate. In 2013 Adeyemi completed the “Makoko Floating School”, a prototype floating structure, built for the water community of Makoko, located on the lagoon heart of Nigeria’s largest city, Lagos. This pilot project took an innovative approach to address the community’s social and physical needs in view of the impact of climate change and a rapidly urbanising context.

Image courtesy of NLE
Image courtesy of NLE

At a cost of less than $7,000 the school accommodates 100 students, uses 256 plastic drums to keep it resting on top of the water, and the frame is constructed from locally-sourced wood. Electricity is provided by solar panels on the roof, and rainwater harvesting helps to keep toilets operational.

Adeyemi has been able to produce an ecologically friendly, alternative building system that could revolutionise Africa’s urban water societies. Now, he is taking the project a step further. He is now looking to expand on his pilot and create a group of floating structures in Makoko, allowing its estimated 250,000 inhabitants better access to sanitation, fresh water and waste disposal.

Image courtesy of NLE
Image courtesy of NLE

Another notable Adeyemi project is the community-built Chicoco radio, in Port Harcourt. The radio station is a floating media platform that provides a voice to 480,000 residents of Port Harcourt’s waterfront slums which line the creeks fringing the city. The governor plans to demolish them all. Not only is the innovative design sustainable and resistant to flooding, but the architecture has also merged with media to become a platform for modern communication and civic participation.

Mick Pearce

Zimbabwean architect Mick Pearce is dedicated to designing low maintenance buildings with low running costs, using renewable energy systems. His aim is to ensure buildings are suited to their natural environment and the people who use them. Over the past 20 years his work has focused heavily on bio-mimicry – an the imitation of natural processes and the use of natural materials.

Image courtesy of MickPearce.com
Image courtesy of MickPearce.com

One of his most famous examples is the Eastgate Centre in Harare. Largely made of concrete, the Eastgate Centre has a ventilation system, which operates similarly to the self-cooling mounds of African termites. Because of its altitude, Harare has a temperate climate and the typical daily temperature swing is 10 to 14 °C, making a passive cooling system a viable alternative to artificial air-conditioning. Passive cooling works by storing heat in the day and venting it at night as temperatures drop. Without relying on conventional air-conditioning or heating the building stays regulated all year round, dramatically reducing energy consumption and the building uses 10% of the energy a conventional building of its size would use.

Tsai Design Studio

Architectural genius is most of the time a combined team effort, on the part of a firm or when two firms come together. It would be impossible to have a list looking at architectural efforts linked to social reform or environmental sustainability without mentioning South Africa’s Tsai design studio. Even though it was established in 2005, this small team of architects has earned a number of design accolades and awards for its architecture and design work – though their community work, re-purposing shipping containers is what stands out.

Image courtesy of Tsai design Studio
Image courtesy of Tsai Design

The studio first became famous for this in 2010 when South African shipping company Safmarine commissioned the studio to develop several designs using recycled containers for community projects. The first Sport Centre prototype was built under a month to coincide with the 2010 FIFA World Cup. The centre allowed disadvantaged children and communities to be twinned with a Dutch football club who trained local coaches with football techniques and life skills.

The design included a grandstand seating social area, a sheltering roof and an advertising billboard and movie screen as an extension of the roof structure that folds down vertically at one side. This can be used as a possible source of income for the sports centre or be converted into a movie screen for the children. Since then, the containers have been re-purposed for a variety of other community projects.

One example is “Vissershok primary school”. Sponsored by three South African Companies; Safmarine, Afrisam and Woolworths, “Vissershok primary school” was created. Serving as a classroom in the morning and a school library in the afternoon, the container provides a well planned environment for the pupils. The large roof keeps out direct sunlight and reduces heat while the windows staggered along the sides of the container ensure cross ventilation.

Source: Mail and Guardian Africa

 


Green-Building-Conference

Attend the Green Building Conference at Sustainability Week.

24-25 June.

Book your seat here.


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