banner

the ecotourism initiatives at Chobe Game Lodge
806 Views

A fresh approach to ecotourism in Africa


When Albert Ndereki first worked at Chobe Game Lodge in 1971, beers were a mere US$ 0.04 cents each and guests were expected to wear formal attire at dinner in the evening. Guests flew directly into Chobe National Park with Botswana Airways (now Air Botswana), landing at Serondela Airstrip by the Chobe River and continued to the lodge on a well-graded road.

Today, he invites us on one of the first Ecotours now offered by Chobe Game Lodge.

From being born in the village of Satau in Northern Botswana to watching Richard Burton serenade Elizabeth Taylor in their private suite after their second wedding, Albert can tell you the stories of how he’s watched Botswana evolve from simple beginnings into the premier destination for safari goers around the world.

Albert talks about how challenging it was to establish Chobe Game Lodge, the first 5-star lodge of its kind in Botswana. “Things were very different then, many of the chefs, waiters, managers and other such people came from places like Zimbabwe, South Africa and overseas because there were no trained Batswana to employ” explains Albert.

“You know for the food waste at the lodge we used to dispose of it in a hole at the back of the lodge which we buried. During the Chobe River sunset cruises we used to tie reeds to fish so the guests could see the fish eagles fly down in front of them and take the floating fish.”

Albert noticed how the African Fish Eagle spent its days watching the boat waiting for its meal and quickly understood that the lodge had a responsibility to the environment and dreamed of changing how things were done.

The lodge now actively works towards benefitting the environment and boosting the local Chobe community. Albert now oversees the ecotourism initiatives at Chobe Game Lodge, inviting guests to explore the lodge on an ecotour and discover what goes on behind the scenes.

During the ecotour, Albert spends time talking about the community, what he calls the most important asset at Chobe Game Lodge, and how the lodge has invested in empowering Batswana from the region. More than 170 local youngsters have been trained and qualified through the Youth Trainee Development Programme initiated by the lodge in 2006.  18 of the graduates took up positions within Chobe Game Lodge while the others went on to further their career in the tourism industry.

“Our company medic ‘Doc B’ visits regularly to give us check-ups and provide any medicine we may need or even counselling and advice.  Every year when the company makes a profit our director calls us together to talk about the year and how we all worked as a team to make it successful. We also receive dividends through the company share scheme. So really for us working at Chobe Game Lodge, it is like being part of a big family community rather than just an employee” says Albert.

On the tour, Albert then introduces us to the ecotourism projects taking place at the lodge. Food waste is now processed in a large biogas plant which produces methane for cooking gas in the staff kitchens. Waste water is treated above ground with new technology that ensures all the grey water is safely recycled into irrigation. In fact, through processes involved in the reduction of rubbish, reusing of materials and recycling initiatives in place, less than 5% of the lodge’s waste ends up in the Kasane refuse facility.

Albert shows guests the first silent CO2 emission free electric game-drive vehicles and safari boats operating in Botswana. Travellers can now move silently through the Chobe National Park observing wildlife in their natural environment, undisturbed by the rumble of a diesel motor. A far cry from guests waiting on a boat for the Fish Eagle to be fed!

But it doesn’t stop there. There are so many fascinating initiatives in place that help keep the lodge environment pristine and natural. It’s incredible to see what can be achieved with a committed approach to responsible tourism and the ecotour is certainly a refreshing look into the future of safari lodges in Africa.

Albert tells us, “If I think back to when I was first offered the job at Chobe Game Lodge in 1971 to what we have now, I am extremely proud and happy to be a part of this place – so much care and attention goes into every part and I really enjoy sharing this with our guests.”

What a privileged to have such a passionate individual like Albert on a team.

Source: Travel News


Responsible Tourism DialogueBook your seat here.


Follow Alive2Green on Social Media

TwitterFacebook LinkedIn Google +

 

Recently Published

Gautrain
»

Mobility Vision

Gauteng-based transport economist Andrew Marsay earlier in February ...

raees
»

Water Research Commission launches the world’s first ’Mine Water Atlas’

The Water Research Commission (WRC) today set the trend as world ...

Screen Shot 2017-03-24 at 10.12.25 AM
»

Wastewater should be recognized as a valuable resource, UN says on World Water Day

In a world where the demand for water continues to grow and the ...

lesedi
»

Exosun partners with Lesedi

Exosun, worldwide leading supplier of advanced, cost-effective solar ...

Screen Shot 2017-03-22 at 4.12.56 PM
»

Adopting green trends can improve your triple bottom line

While South Africa continues to move towards a green trend when ...

Screen Shot 2017-03-22 at 3.34.43 PM
»

Entrepreneurs can help in the quest for safe drinking water

A recent article in the Asia & The Pacific Policy Society policy ...

Screen Shot 2017-03-22 at 3.28.31 PM
»

Charge electric cars smartly to take pressure off national grid – minister

SSE trials ‘demand-side response’ where vehicles start charging a ...

Screen Shot 2017-03-17 at 10.03.42 AM
»

Plastic ban to affect economy, manufactures say

Plastic bags are not the problem, consumer behaviour is, the Kenya ...

Screen Shot 2017-03-17 at 9.47.40 AM
»

Oyster Bay Lodge now Fair Trade Tourism approved

Oyster Bay Lodge, a four-star luxury lodge situated on a natural ...