banner

Screen Shot 2015-03-27 at 12.22.53 PM
997 Views

DWS/WESSA water project wins United Nations award


WESSA Eco-Schools and the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has won a United Nations Water for Life Best Practices Award.
The joint DWS/WESSA Eco-Schools Water Project won the award in the category ‘Best participatory, communication, awareness-raising and education practices’ and shares the award with Project India.

The annual Water for Life Best Practices Award aims to acknowledge and promote efforts to meet international commitments made on water and related issues by 2015. The award recognises outstanding projects that are working to ensure sustainable long-term management of water resources and to help achieve the water and sanitation targets of the Millennium Development Goals, Agenda 21 and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation.

The DWS/WESSA Eco-Schools Water Project – officially launched at the Youth Summit on Water and Climate Change in July 2014 – encourages water conservation and the wise use of water resources at school level from grades R to 12. The 50 participating schools are required to set up a water action project that includes the entire school and members of the local community.

Main objective

The project’s main objective is to strengthen water and sanitation education in South Africa through implementation of the international Eco-School Programme’s seven step framework for Education for Sustainable Development learning and change. These steps guide schools through a learning process which promotes water conservation and sanitation education, as well as engaging learners in enquiry-based learning methods which empower them to better understand their local water context and to take action to improve this.

The project has a strong inclusivity focus, emphasising public participation, participatory learning processes and action taking. Activities are focused on better water management and ensuring water security for the more disadvantaged communities that may not have access to potable water. This is especially problematic in areas where water is increasingly scarce due to climate change and poor catchment management practices.

The success of the project, now recognised by this significant international award, is an example of government and civil society organisations working together effectively in the education and environmental conservation fields.

Source: Bizcommunity

Water Resource Seminar
Book your seat here.
Join the discussion here.

Follow Alive2Green on Social Media

TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle +

Recently Published

Property-Buyer-Show-Gauteng-Banner-800x304
»

How to choose the best real estate agent when buying your first home

Buying your first home is a daunting process in itself, which is why ...

Screen Shot 2017-10-19 at 10.14.22 AM
»

Global water insecurity calls for water infrastructure maintenance

The growing funding gap to keep up with the rehabilitation, operation ...

Screen Shot 2017-10-19 at 10.02.53 AM
»

Regreening the planet could cut as much carbon as halting oil use – report

Natural solutions such as tree planting, protecting peatlands and ...

a2ginfrast
»

Johannesburg’s Executive Mayor Herman Mashaba to address African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit in Sandton on 25 October

“Rejuvenation of the inner city a key priority for the new ...

ITC
»

Laminated timber beams to comply with regulations

The Institute for Timber Construction South Africa (ITC-SA), South ...

worms
»

Organic waste – What to do?

Have you ever felt frustrated with the food waste that you throw ...

greenbuilding
»

Meet the Green Building Convention 2017 keynote speakers

This year, we have included speed networking stations at the GBCSA ...

school
»

Streetlights Schools: Wellness In Education

In keeping with sustainable school design and child mental health ...

gproperties25
»

Growthpoint powers innovation with its NWU Solar Car team sponsorship

Pushing the boundaries of what is possible for alternative energy and ...