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Waste warriors have a kiloton of fun at Schools Recycling Awards

More than 1 000 tonnes of waste has dodged the dump this year thanks to the Schools Recycling Programme of Coca-Cola Beverages SA – a landfill-saving 300 tonnes more than was collected by participating schools in 2016.

Along the way, learners created everything from skipping ropes, abacus counters, backpacks and stationery holders to musical instruments – all from junk.

Guests were treated to a musical performance on a violin made of tin, while a living plant wall made from recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET) adorned the venue.

Just under 600 schools took part, involving half a million learners in an initiative that earns revenue for the schools while instilling the values of environmental stewardship in the youngsters who, in turn, spread the message at home and in their communities.

“Our ideal is to nurture a generation of environmental champions to create a permanent shift in the way we deal with waste as a society,” said CCBSA MD Velaphi Ratshefola.

The top three primary and high schools in the country were unveiled at a festive awards ceremony on Wednesday at The Sheds in Alexander Street, Johannesburg, where guests were treated to performances by SA’s Got Talent finalists Paint Addiction, among others.

In the primary school competition, the first prize of R50 000 went to Ekuthuleni Primary School, Kwa-Mashu in Durban, the 2ndprize of R30 000 to Siphosethu Primary School, also from Kwa-Mashu, Durban and third prize of R20 000 to Motjibosane Primary School from Hammanskraal.

In the high school competition, the first prize of R50 000 went to Motherwell High School in Port Elizabeth, the 2nd prize of R30 000 to V.M. Kwinana Secondary School, Port Elizabeth and third prize of R20 000 to Tlhatlogang Secondary School in Mofolo, Soweto.

All the prize money will be used to upgrade the schools’ infrastructure, meaning the schools recycling class of 2017 have left a lasting legacy for future generations to enjoy.

Director for General Waste Minimisation in the Department of Environmental Affairs, Mr Dumisani Buthelezi, said: “We need big corporates to take responsibility for the collection of their post-consumer waste and that’s exactly what Coca-Cola Beverages SA is doing with its Schools Recycling Programme.

“At the same time, these learners are developing their critical thinking skills in a practical exercise that challenges them to combine development objectives with environmental stewardship. It’s wonderful to see such commitment from these youngsters.”

The winning schools were selected from those that collected more than 2 tonnes of waste a month for the duration of the competition, and were judged not only on the volume of waste collected, but also their involvement of parents and communities in the process.

The programme exceeded its target of 820 tonnes of waste collected by 40%, with the total haul for the year of 1 146 tonnes breaking all previous records.

Close to R15 million has been invested in the Schools Recycling Programme since its inception six years ago, more than 60 young people have been employed as Recycling Representatives and 134 collectors have been trained and supported.

This year’s awards and prizes, which included the 8 Tonne Challenge, were valued at over R1 million in total.

For the first time, Waste Collector Recognition Awards were formalised in 2017 to call attention to the loyalty and service of partner collectors and businesses.

As part of CCBSA’s Enterprise Development Programme, collectors were given professional help to develop their businesses and become more sustainable in the long run.

Green Planet Laundry: Cheaper than washing at home and even your local laundromat!

The average washing machine uses 50 litres of water per load. While Capetonians are allowed only 87 litres of water per person per day, washing one’s clothing at home is almost impossible. Save money – and the environment – with Green Planet Laundry.

Experts predict that the Western Cape drought will continue to have a big impact on citizens for years to come, and that even once it passes, we will need to do more to limit our daily water consumption. Green Planet Laundry’s innovative process, which uses purified borehole water instead of drinking water to clean your laundry, is a major step in the right direction. But, whenever consumers hear the words “green,” “eco-conscious” or “eco-friendly,” they think expensive. The great news is that Green Planet Laundry offers competitive pricing, and in many cases, they’recheaper than your local laundromat!

For washing and folding, the average laundromat in Cape Town charges between R25 and R40 per kilogram of laundry, and between R34 and R45 to have the washed laundry ironed as well. Green Planet comes in under with the average with this impressive price list:

Wash & Fold (5kg minimum) R28 per kg
Wash, Iron & Fold (5kg minimum) R40 per kg
Blankets & Duvet Inners From R89 per item
Curtains (including ironing) R75 per kg
Shoes (fabric) R60 per pair
Stain treatment R15 per item

See the full price list here: https://greenplanetlaundry.com/price-list/

Why is it so affordable? Municipal (drinking) water is expensive, and the average laundromat uses thousands of litres of it every day. Green Planet Laundry uses sophisticated equipment to extract and purify underground borehole water, which eliminates water bills while preserving our precious water supply. This allows Green Planet Laundry to keep costs down, and make this revolutionary system more affordable for the public.

Green Planet Laundry will open its doors in Cape Town on 16 October 2017.

About Green Planet Laundry

Unlike other Commercial Laundries, the Cape Town based Green Planet Laundry does not tap into the city’s precious municipal water supply. Instead, they make use of purified borehole water. That means that absolutely no tap water is used!

How does it work?

The Water used at Green Planet Laundry is 100% ground water (borehole).  Additionally, 50% of the (grey) water used in our machines is recycled therefore further reducing required ground water.

Cape Town residents can now experience the convenience of sending their laundry to be cleaned without the guilt of wasting natural resources. Water restrictions in the Western Cape are becoming a permanent fixture, and this is a perfect opportunity through which residents can decrease the number of litres consumed by their household.

 

Green Planet Laundry services all the greater Cape Town areas from Strand to Paarl to Duynefontein to Cape Point.

For more information, please mail Anien at anien@thelittleblackbook.co.za.

Top waste-busters to be unveiled at awards event

More than half a million learners from almost 600 schools have taken a message in the bottle into their homes and communities this year as part of Coca-Cola Beverages SA’s Schools Recycling Programme.

On September 27, these young environmental ambassadors will find out who came out tops at the annual Schools Recycling Awards ceremony in Johannesburg, where the top three waste-busting primary and high schools will be announced.

Participating schools commit to collecting at least 1000kg of waste a month – at least 30% of which must be polyethylene terephthalate (PET) – and those with a monthly haul of more than 2 tonnes stand a chance of winning cash prizes to be used for the upgrading of their facilities.

The programme is a part of CCBSA’s commitment to collecting post-consumer waste and raising awareness about the importance of waste management and recycling among learners in regions where it has a presence.

“Schools are the perfect partner in such a programme as learners take the message of environmental stewardship home with them, spreading it within their direct circle of influence and, in the longer term as they grow up and become adults, driving responsible behaviour in their families and communities,” says Tsholofelo Mqhayi, Head: Enterprise and Community Development at CCBSA.

The programme has gone from strength to strength in the six years since its inception, with a total of 597 schools participating in 2017, compared to 40 in 2011.

Last year schools collected a total of 710 tonnes of PET, cans and paper, saving 3 951.6m³ of landfill space.

Apart from standing a chance of winning a cash prize – and helping to remove PET from the waste stream – participating schools earn revenue from the recycling material collected, while learners begin to understand complex sustainability issues.

“Using knowledge, critical thinking skills and values, they are developing the capacity to participate in decision making about environmental and development issues,” says Mqhayi.

The programme has also created permanent jobs for 53 youth Recycling Representatives in CCBSA and elsewhere.

Once the competition has closed for the year, the top 10 schools undergo a rigorous adjudication process during September to determine the top three schools nationally.

Judges consider what each school has collected and also give schools an opportunity to present how they have included communities and parents in the process.

The Schools Recycling Awards are held to honour the schools that have excelled in the programme. The event is attended by learners and teachers from various regions, as well as stakeholders who have assisted in making the programme a success.

Organic Pig Production Reduces Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

A recent study published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Microbiology has found that pigs raised on organic farms have significantly fewer strains of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter bacteria than pigs raised on conventional farms. Campylobacter is a bacteria known to jump from livestock, particularly from poultry and pigs, to infect humans. Researchers took fecal or colon samples from organic and conventional pigs in France and Sweden and tested them for Campylobacter bacteria as well as antibiotic-resistant strains. Pigs were tested from 50 farms in France and 54 farms in Sweden. Unsurprisingly, they found that there was no difference in the amount of Campylobacter bacteria from organic or conventional farms. Naturally associated with pigs, Campylobacter was expected to be found on all farms. However, the study results did show that organic samples from France had significantly fewer antibiotic-resistant strains than samples from conventional farms. Meanwhile, pigs raised in Sweden exhibited no difference in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter. This result may have been because different species of Campylobacter bacteria are found in Sweden and France, and biological variation among these species may equate to differences in how antibiotic resistance develops and persists in the bacteria.

Source: organic-center

Water scarcity under the spotlight at Water Research Council meeting

Water scarcity in South Africa will be high on the agenda of a three-day Water Research Council meeting under the theme “Adaptation to the New Normal”‚ which opened on Monday east of Johannesburg.

South Africa is recovering from the 2016 drought and the Western and Eastern Cape are still experiencing critical water shortages.

Minister of Water and Sanitation Nomvula Mokonyana said the rise of extreme weather patterns because of climate change and a growing global population were realities which impacted on water resources.

“The challenges are global‚ therefore the memoranda of understanding with neighbouring Namibia and the Water Research Council must assist in resolving challenges in the regions‚” she said.

The minister said a high-level panel on water was meeting at the UN this week.

“The outcomes of this symposium must speak to a better water future and encourage international partnerships‚” Mokonyana said.

She said Gauteng enjoyed water from Lesotho because of such a partnership.

Water Research Council CEO Desighen Naidoo said the current infrastructure and regulatory environment in South Africa needed to be revisited with vigour.

Priorities he listed included: “Enabling sustainable development and ensuring universal access to basic services in the new normal through creativity‚ innovation and systems amenable to dynamic adaptation and improvement.”

The council’s biennial symposium is a platform for new knowledge and innovation to improve water and sanitation delivery.

South Africa’s average annual rainfall of 490mm is far lower than that of the global average‚ of 814mm per year‚ according to the WWF (World Wide Fund For Nature).

The authoritative Atlas of Freshwater Ecosystem Priority Areas in South Africa reports that more than half of the country’s rivers are being strangled by pollution and water extraction.

Source: talkofthetown

Hospitality Marketing Maven Joins Premier Hotels & Resorts

With over 25 years of marketing, public relations and events management experience – predominantly within the hospitality industry – Christa Badenhorst has been appointed by Premier Hotels & Resorts as the Group’s new Marketing Manager.

The hospitality chain’s Founder and Managing Director, Samuel Nassimov, says: “Christa is a seasoned marketing professional and is well-placed to assist us in achieving our vision of becoming the preferred destination of choice among the discerning business and leisure market. She brings local and international experience, passion, energy and a can-do attitude to the table.”

Badenhorst began her post-graduate career at the South African Broadcasting Company (SABC), during which time she obtained a diploma in Public Relations and went on to become the Publicity Officer for the National Symphony Orchestra.  Later, she joined Amalgamated Beverage Industries’ Fountain Division as a Public Relations Officer, where she managed the account for the best-selling and most popular brand in the world, Coca-Cola.

In 1997, Badenhorst was appointed as the Marketing and PR Manager of a leading Muldersdrift wedding venue. She then made the move to Cape Town when an opportunity arose at a hospitality group that would enable her to enhance her experience of the industry. As their Operations and Guest Relations Manager, she gained deeper insight into the field, which has stood her in good stead in subsequent roles.

In 2001, she was given the opportunity of a lifetime to work in Dubai where, as a Senior Account Manager, her main client was a large global hotel chain that at that stage had 122 properties in the Middle East and North Africa. After almost three years in the United Arab Emirates, Badenhorst’s longing for family and fresh air brought her back home and she began working as a PR Manager at a small Melville-based firm.

Following the emigration of her employer and consequent closure of the business, she joined an award-winning upmarket Pretoria country estate as its Marketing Manager. She was later approached by the director of a hotel and spa group to establish a group identity – a challenge she welcomed. Highlights of her ten years with the company include establishing an in-house PR, media and social media department as well as the opening and rebranding of several hotels, Spas and restaurants bringing the total property count to nine units.

Over the course of her career Badenhorst has constantly upskilled herself in order to adapt to the ever-changing marketing landscape, adding numerous qualifications to her name.

On her appointment, Badenhorst shares: “I am so excited about having the opportunity to work alongside a visionary like Mr Nassimov, who has built this empire from nothing to 16 outstanding properties. Premier Hotel Cape Town has just completed an R11 million renovation, Premier Resort Sani Pass has undergone a R75 million overhaul and both Premier Hotel Cape Town and Premier Resort The Moorings in Knysna have introduced kosher facilities. Now, we are about to embark on upgrades to a new property in Bloemfontein. With so many renovations and launches lined up, we are heading for an exciting year and I am so proud to be part of this process.”

“We are thrilled to have Christa joining our company and look forward to seeing her immense experience and expertise in action,” concludes Nassimov.

For more information, visit https://www.premierhotels.co.za.

Source: Premier Hotel

Record numbers of volunteers participate in 2017 international coastal clean-up day

This past weekend saw the 21st year in which South Africa participated in the International Coastal Clean-Up (ICC) – an annual event that has become the biggest, global volunteer effort for ocean health.

Despite inclement weather experienced in Cape Town on the day,  2017 would be remembered for having one of the best turn-outs of volunteers who freely offered up their time to participate in picking up litter from our beaches.

“We will only have the official stats of the amount and type of litter collected later this year once all the audit sheets have been compiled and analysed, but we can definitely say that we saw an increase in the number of community groups, schools and businesses who participated in this year’s ICC,” said Douw Steyn, Sustainability Director: Plastics|SA.
Although extensive education and communication campaigns have been taking place over the past few years, volunteers agreed that they were shocked to see how much litter is still found on our country’s beaches.
Packaging continues to be a major culprit and items such as straws, sweet wrappers, chips packets, earbuds and cigarette butts were found strewn across our coastlines.
“Approximately 75% of ocean litter is derived from land based waste. Without effective waste collection, an avalanche of debris enters the ocean. Even a packet that is carelessly thrown out of a car window thousands of kilometres inland, could eventually find its way to the ocean.
We need to address the importance of an effective waste management system upstream and increase our efforts to educate the public about the importance of recycling. Plastics is not the problem. People not discarding their used plastics products properly or ensuring it gets recycled, is the issue that needs to be addressed,” Steyn advocated.
“Effective methods for separation-at-source and the collection of recyclable materials are vital if we are to find a long-term and workable solution. To this end, we invite industry bodies, government and communities to work together with us as we count down to the World Clean-Up Day that will take place next year on the 15th of Septemberas part of the global “Let’s Do It” Campaign*.
This worldwide wave of clean-ups will start in New Zealand and follow the sunthrough 24 time zones, ending 36 hours later in Hawaii. Volunteers from more than 150 countries will join the world’s biggest positive civic collaboration in the fight against illegal waste.
“Our sincere thanks everyone who was involved in this year’s activities and helped to make a difference in their environment. Without the support of our many sponsors and the help of every volunteer, we would not have been able to collect the large amount of litter that we did on Saturday.
We are busy writing a success story that shows what can be accomplished through teamwork and a commitment to save the environment for future generations,” Steyn concluded.
Source: Plastics SA

Nordic Energy Days: Clean and renewable energy vital for the Southern African Power Pool

The Nordic countries Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden hosted the Nordic Energy Days conference from September 13 through 14 at The Innovation Hub in Pretoria. The countries have over the last 10 years collaborated amongst themselves to develop an innovative energy mix focused on effective system integration, grid stability and sustainable energy solutions.

The Nordic countries outlined their experience and the function of their energy mix, with Finland’s Deputy Minister of Economic Affairs and Employment Petri Peltonen stating:

“We have very advanced electricity and energy systems and our grids have been connected for decades. The Nord Pool has now been in operation since the 1990s and it is the world’s largest exchange for electricity …. We are trying to increase the share and production of renewable energy from various sources, Finland being focused on bio-based sources and our colleagues in hydro, wind and others …. The South African government objectives are also ambitious regarding renewable energy in particular and I think our mission is really to first of all open up our experiences, lessons learned, the positive and at the same time also connect the best of our resources, companies, agencies, research organisations with our South African counterparts during the Nordic Energy Days.”

Ambassador of Sweden to South Africa Cecilia Julin added:

“The Nordic cooperation is really strong and I think that’s what we want to share with South Africa as well … because we get inspired by SADC to show possibilities to work in the Southern African Power Pool. We can share experiences from Nord Pool and how we can work together.”

Day one of the conference was focused on opportunities for the Southern African Power Pool (SAPP) teaming up with the Nordic countries. Norwegian Deputy Minister Ingvil Smines Tybring-Gjedde stated that embracing the diversification of energy sources will minimise the effects of global warming, whilst significantly enhancing the share of energy between countries within the SADC region as it has done for the Nordic countries.

The Nordic countries have shown a particular interest in working with the region by assisting in the facilitation of cross-border cooperation. The countries also indicated a desired involvement in ensuring energy security in Europe by developing a prolonged relationship with the African continent.

Special energy adviser to the South African presidency Silas Zimu said on this point:

“Let us learn from what the Nordic countries have done …. Public companies need to put measures into place.”

The second day of the conference highlighted the technical side of the energy sector focused on clean technology and grid technology. In a session on clean technology, DNV GL Africa’s business manager Robert O’Keefe talked on the decarbonisation of the energy system within the next 30 years due to increased efficiency in energy generation leading to a significant decrease in the overall demand of energy. He went on to state that the global use of fossil fuels to generate energy would decrease from 81% to 50% by 2050, which can be troubling for Southern Africa as a region profoundly endowed with coal as a source for power generation.

To effectively support the integration of clean energy into the SAPP it is vital for the region to develop a stable grid. Stig Uffe-Pederson, Deputy Director General of the Danish Energy Agency, highlighted the importance of these technologies, mentioning:

“This is also a story about making a green transition. This is about investing and setting long-term political projections and a stable framework that allows this transition. In that way, you are actually able to sustain economic growth while you reduce your energy emissions and while you also reduce your energy consumption.”

Environment officials talk sustainable tourism in Samoa

Environment officials are in Apia to begin talks starting with a focus on sustainable eco tourism.

The 28th SPREP meeting got underway this morning with the incoming chair, Umiich Sengebau who is the Minister for the Environment in Palau, saying he wanted other members to take a leaf out of his country’s success story to move forward in this area.

He spoke of introducing and endorsing the user pays system that had been so successful in his country.

“Palau has always been known as a diving mecca,” Mr Sengebau said.

“We knew this is where Palau is gonna go and it was important that we also protect the very resources that the tourists come for.

“And of course our president has always been fond of saying that our environment is our economy and our economy is our environment.”

Mr Sengebau encouraged members to take care of their eco systems to ensure sustainability.

SPREP Director-General Kosi Latu said the SPREP meeting would echo many of the issues talked about during the recent Pacific Islands Forum Leaders meeting.

“Our strategy plan recognises the challenges as articulated on the global and regional stage by our Pacific leaders who met here about two weeks ago in Apia,” Mr Latu said.

“Where climate change, again our principle concern and oceans as our key cross-cutting theme, was highlighted by our leaders when they met here in Samoa”

Concern over ocean pollution is likely to dominate the meeting, with Mr Latu saying the Pacific region is 98 percent ocean and 2 percent land.

He said a long-standing worry about the transportation of nuclear waste through the Pacific would also be on the agenda.

“We don’t know when these shipments happen and often we require prior notification, so we are aware of where these shipments are going and where they are coming from,” Mr Latu said.

” And it can get very political. But that has been a concern for a very, very long time.”

Mr Latu said SPREP also had a role in assisting member countries to access climate change finance.

“To achieve this we must focus our efforts in strengthening the work that we do to ensure that SPREP is able to mobilise, allocate and direct technical and financial resources to make a difference where it is relevant and has the greatest impact for our communities.”

The meeting is scheduled for the next three days.

Source: radionz.

Huge impact of subtle law changes on mining and oil & gas industries

Analysis of proposed change to financial provisioning laws

Financial provisioning laws require mining and petroleum companies to set aside an amount of money for the management, remediation and rehabilitation of environmental aspects arising from mining and petroleum operations. Financial provisioning is a legislative attempt to promote a greener and healthier environment by holding mining and petroleum companies responsible for the rehabilitation of the environment impacted by their operations. For example, when applying for a mining right, a mining company is required to indicate the manner in which they are going to rehabilitate their mining area after the mine is closed and set aside an amount of money for this rehabilitation, before the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) will grant a mining right.

History of financial provisioning

Financial provisioning and rehabilitation was initially regulated under section 41 of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Act, 2002 (MPRDA) which required an applicant for a right or permit to make prescribed financial provision for the rehabilitation or management of negative environmental impacts associated with the operation. The quantum of the financial provision was determined in accordance with Regulation 53 and 54 of the MPRDA Regulations, 2004 (“MPRDA Regulations“) and the guideline document provided by the DMR. These provisions have now been superseded by the Financial Provisioning Regulations published under Government Notice Regulation 1147 in Government Gazette 39425 on 20 November 2015 (“Financial Provisioning Regulations“), in terms of section 24P of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (NEMA).

The NEMA provisions and Financial Provisioning Regulations are in line with the move towards the ‘One Environmental System’ which looks to transfer environmental governance of the mining and petroleum industries from the MPRDA to the NEMA. The Financial Provisioning Regulations are more onerous than the previous financial provisions under the MPRDA. The Financial Provisioning Regulations came into effect on 20 November 2015, but the transitional provisions (as amended) indicate that existing holders of mining rights will only need to comply with the Financial Provisioning Regulations by 19 February 2019.

Under the MPRDA, financial provisioning was required to take the following into account: costs for the rehabilitation of the surface area of operations; costs for the decommissioning and final closure of the operation and post-closure management of residual and latent environmental impacts. These requirements provided for a broad description of the types of rehabilitation and remediation that were to take place. However, no detail was provided as to exactly what this would entail or what closure standards should be achieved. Under the Financial Provisioning Regulations, there is more certainty surrounding what should be considered as part of a mines financial provisioning. The Financial Provisioning Regulations now require the holder of a right / permit to ensure that an Annual Rehabilitation Plan, an Environmental Risk Assessment Report and a Final Rehabilitation, Decommissioning and Mine Closure Plan, as set out in the Financial Provisioning Regulations, (the Three Plans) are undertaken and submitted prior to the right being granted. The Three Plans require specific actions for annual and progressive concurrent rehabilitation to take place.

NEMA Bill, 2017 and financial provisioning

Similar to the provisions of the MPRDA, section 24P(3)(a) of NEMA requires the holder of a right / permit to perform an annual review of their environmental liabilities and increase their financial provisioning accordingly. The National Environmental Management Laws Amendment Bill, 2017 was published under Government Notice 245 in Government Gazette 40733 on 31 March 2017 (the NEMLA Bill) and was tabled in Parliament on 24 May 2017. The NEMLA Bill introduces a significant proposed change in relation to financial provisioning and the required annual assessments of same.

The NEMLA Bill looks to amend section 24P(3)(a) of NEMA to read that the holders must “..annually assess his or her environmental liability in a prescribed manner and must adjust his or her financial provision accordingly…” This change brings section 24P(3)(a) in line with Regulation 11(2) of the Financial Provisioning Regulations which already provides for an annual adjustment of financial provisioning as opposed to a forced increase, which has previously been required under the MPRDA and NEMA.

This change from “increase” to “adjust” is very significant for the mining and petroleum industries and may present a number of opportunities that allow for operations to decrease their financial provisioning over the life of the operation, instead of unnecessarily having to increase it for no reason other than avoiding contravening the financial provisioning legislation.

New opportunities for the mining industry

The Financial Provisioning Regulations are more onerous than previous financial provisioning requirements, because they stipulate a comprehensive minimum content for each of the Three Plans to inform the quantum of financial provisioning. This itemised and detailed approach to financial provisioning presents as an extra cost for the mining and petroleum industries, however, it also allows for adjustments to the mine’s financial provisioning to be made based on the mine’s actual operational requirements. Furthermore, it ensures that the on-going annual rehabilitation that is required to take place as per the Annual Rehabilitation Plan will be taken into account and the financial provisioning can be adjusted and decreased accordingly.

The change proposed to be implemented by the NEMLA Bill presents an opportunity for mining and petroleum companies to decrease their rehabilitation liability by implementing effective and innovative mechanisms that promote rehabilitation and remediation throughout the life of operations and not only at the closure of the operation. This on-going remediation and rehabilitation will result in a reduced financial provision being required at the closure of the operation. Initiatives such as captive power and captive water should accordingly become more appealing to mining and petroleum operations.

A captive power plant is a power generation facility that allows for an industrial or commercial energy user to produce its own electricity. Captive power presents an opportunity to the mining and petroleum industries by putting them in a position to produce their own power. Electricity generally amounts to up to 40% of a mines annual budget. A captive power facility would alleviate the dependence on the grid and studies show that over time, the cost of captive power will be at parity with grid power. In addition to this commercial benefit, laying out the capital cost for such a plant during the operational phase of an operation will reduce the liability of the closure phase as the plant can continue to supply power to the operation well into the closure and post-closure stages. It is believed that by establishing a captive power plant, an operation could adjust and decrease its rehabilitation provisioning over time.

Captive water is a similar concept to captive power, in that it presents an opportunity to create a cost-effective, reliable and high quality supply of water to an operation. Captive water introduces the idea of an operation constructing an internal treatment facility. This entails dirty water produced during operations being recycled and treated on-site to be re-used by the operation. For operations which anticipate having to pump and treat water well into the closure phases of their life, a captive water solution will be particularly attracted to reduce the rehabilitation costs associated with this latent or residual environmental risk.

Both captive power and captive water solutions could be pursued on either an EPC or an Independent Power/Water Producer basis.

Conclusion

Initiatives such as captive power and captive water are not only beneficial for the environment, but they are also perfectly positioned to take advantage of the opportunity presented by the proposed amendment in the NEMLA Bill, which provides operations with the ability to decrease financial provisioning, as they assist in necessitating lower rehabilitation costs for a mine. This proposed amendment should be welcomed by the mining and petroleum industries as it presents an opportunity to implement numerous initiatives that may reduce their financial provisioning over time.

By Hillary Botha (Candidate Attorney), Tamzyn Cooper (Associate) and settled by Garyn Rapson (Partner) of Webber Wentzel